Rules, Regulations, Precautions
Canyonlands National Park

Overview Climate/
Map
Description Things
To Do
Camping/
Lodging
Nearby/
Resources


Safety Precautions

Harsh Conditions

Heat, intense sunlight, low humidity, and high elevation require people to adapt to harsh desert conditions. Carry and drink at least one gallon of water each day; more if involved in strenuous activities or cooking. Avoid overexposure to intense sun. During hotter times of year, save strenuous activity for mornings or evenings.

Storms

Storms and flash floods can hit suddenly and without warning. During a lightning storm, avoid lone trees, cliff edges and high ridges. Return to your vehicle if possible. Crouch low to the ground. Flash floods can occur without warning. Never camp in a dry wash or try to cross a wash during flood conditions.

Temperatures

Winter temperatures drop well below freezing. Hypothermia is a hazard in fall, winter and spring and year-round on the rivers. Carry warm, dry clothing, and be prepared to spend a night out. Carry storm gear and a flashlight. Snow can cover rock cairns, making route finding nearly impossible after a storm.

Beware

Be careful near cliff edges, especially when conditions are wet or icy. Avoid loose rock. Remember, slickrock is easier to climb up than down.

Drive Carefully

Driving conditions change rapidly and may become hazardous. Drive slowly. Be prepared for wet, muddy, snowy, or icy conditions. In most cases, four-wheel-drive roads are too steep, too rocky, too rough, too sandy, and simply too hazardous for two-wheel-drive vehicles. A high clearance four-wheel-drive vehicle is usually required for backcountry roads.

Getting Lost

Stay with companions in the backcountry; separation can mean getting lost.

Carry a map and compass and know how to use them. Do not count on a cellular phone to summon help; cellular service will not reach into many areas of canyon country. If you become lost or separated from a group, it is better to remain in one place. Wandering will endanger your life and make finding you difficult. Always leave details of your itinerary with friends or family so that they can notify the park if you are missing.

Potable Water

Treat all water found in the backcountry. Use of a filter, iodine tablets or boiling water for up to five minutes are the most efficient ways of eliminating waterborne diseases. Water from the Colorado or Green rivers should be collected and allowed to settle before treating.

Rapids

The Colorado River in Cataract Canyon contains large rapids. "Flipped" boat incidents are common, especially during high water when rapids can range up to class V. In recent years, a number of people have drowned or been injured. A river trip through Cataract Canyon, even for the most experienced and best equipped, can be dangerous and represents a risk. Personal flotation devices must be worn below the Confluence; however, it is recommended that they be worn at all times while in or on the rivers of the park.

Backcounrtry Regulations

A backcountry permit must be visibly displayed while traveling in the backcountry. Regulations exist to protect park resources and reduce visitor impact. It is the trip leader's responsibility to assure that all members of a group know and obey the following regulations while in the backcountry. Regulations for land use and river use are listed below. Additional information regarding backcountry regulations is available upon request.

Land Use

  • Permit is valid only for the dates and areas listed.
  • For human waste disposal, use vault toilets where provided. Portable toilets are required for all visitors using designated campsites in the Maze District and at the New Bates Wilson site in the Needles. Backpackers should dig a 4" to 6" deep "cat hole," at least 300 feet, from water sources and campsites. Pack out toilet paper.
  • All wood fires are prohibited. Charcoal fires are allowed at designated vehicle campsites. Visitors must use a firepan and remove unburned charcoal and fire debris.
  • Pets, weapons and littering are prohibited. Pack out all garbage.
  • Disturbing, entering or camping within 300 feet of an archaeological site or historical site is prohibited. Collecting artifacts is prohibited.
  • Backpackers must camp at least one mile from all roads (including four-wheel-drive roads) or trailheads.
  • Camping within 300 feet, or use of soap within 100 feet, of a water source is prohibited. River corridor camping is excluded from this regulation.
  • Camping outside the established campsite boundary at a designated campsite is prohibited. Disturbing or collecting natural features is prohibited.
  • Hunting, feeding or disturbing wildlife is prohibited.
  • Possession or operation of a bicycle or motor vehicle off a designated road or out of a developed campsite is prohibited.

River Use

  • Permit is valid only for the dates and areas listed.
  • Permit is not valid for commercial use.
  • Human waste must be contained and removed from the backcountry. All groups must use a cleanable, reuseable toilet system.
  • Wood and charcoal fires are permitted along the river corridor. Fires must be contained in a firepan and all fire debris must be removed from the backcountry. White ash may be scattered in the main river channel. Only driftwood and dead-and-down Tamarisk may be collected for firewood.
  • Motorboats must be registered in accordance with the state in which the owner resides. All motorboats must carry a fire extinguisher.
  • All vessels must have one personal flotation device (PFD) for each person on board. PFDs must be worn when traveling below the Confluence.
  • All vessels must carry one spare paddle or oar.
  • Upstream travel in Cataract Canyon is prohibited.
  • Pets, weapons and littering are prohibited. Pack out all garbage.
  • Disturbing, entering or camping within 300 feet of an archaeological site or historical site is prohibited. Collecting artifacts is prohibited.
  • Camping within 300 feet, or use of soap within 100 feet, of springs or intermittent streams is prohibited.
  • Disturbing or collecting natural features is prohibited.
  • Hunting, feeding or disturbing wildlife is prohibited. Fishing is allowed in accordance with Utah state laws.

Overview Climate/
Map
Description Things
To Do
Camping/
Lodging
Nearby/
Resources




SEARCH THIS SITE















Copyright © 1996-2014 DesertUSA.com and Digital West Media, Inc.