DesertUSA

Southwest Adventure, Living & Travel


Sedona, Arizona

Sedona contains a concentration of vortexes



Sedona is located at the lower end of Arizona's spectacular Oak Creek Canyon, renowned for its stunning red buttes and monoliths, as well as its surrounding lush forests. Sedona is located in both Coconino and Yavapai Counties and is completely surrounded by the Coconino National Forest.

Sedona has become a center for traditional and contemporary arts and offers a variety of galleries, boutiques and specialty shops. It is an upscale retirement and tourism community, because it is the jumping off place for tours of the Red Rocks region.




Population / Elevation

  • 16,000
  • 4,500 feet above sea level

Weather / Climate




Click for Sedona, Arizona Forecast


Hotel Rates, availability, customer reviews and reservation online

History


For more than 11,000 years, humans have lived in the Sedona region. The first inhabitants were Indians of Asian ancestry. They hunted, gathered and cultivated in the area until Europeans and their descendants entered the area 500 years ago.

The first Europeans to discover the region in 1583 were members of a Spanish expedition in search of legendary rich Indian mines. A few expeditions may have passed through the Sedona region, but it is uncertain exactly which trails were traveled.

Sedona began as a small, remote ranching and farming settlement in 1876 when the first permanent settler, John James Thompson, settled on property in Oak Creek Canyon, claiming it under the 1862 Homesteaders Act. By 1902, 20 families lived in the settlement and a postal station was petitioned for by Theodore Schnelbly. The petition was granted and Schnelbly named the new post office in honor of his wife, Sedona.



The remote agricultural community was well-know for the quality of its fruit, especially the abundant apple orchards. But as the scenic wonders and sites of Sedona became known, tourism surpassed agriculture in economic importance.

In 1950, surrealist painter Max Ernst moved to Sedona, and other famous artists followed. Many artists have been attracted to Sedona and its rugged beauty which is said to enhance their creativity. Over the years, an artist's colony has developed in Sedona and many of the artists sell their work in local galleries and shops.

It may have been more than the scenic red rocks that stimulated the creativity of artists. It is believed by many people that the region of Sedona contains a concentration of vortexes - spots that release psychic energy or power from the Earth. The four local points which are considered to be energy vortexes are Bell Rock, Table Top Mountain, Cathedral Rock and Boynton Canyon.


Things To Do

Activities and Information

  • Tours See the Grand Canyon, Painted Desert, Historic Trading Post, and more
  • Hiking - Year-round hiking on maintained trails makes Sedona a hiking mecca.
  • Mountain Biking- Numerous trails are maintained for mountain biking.
  • Jeep Tours - Sedona is home to numerous Jeep tour companies.
  • Fishing - Oak Creek is regularly stocked with trout in the summer.
  • Horseback Riding - Local stables offer trail rides and tours on horseback through the beautiful red rock country
  • Golf - Contact Sedona's Chamber of Commerce for more information.
  • Tennis - Contact Sedona's Chamber of Commerce for more information.
  • Swimming - Contact Sedona's Chamber of Commerce for more information.
  • Shopping - Sedona is well known for it's art galleries, boutiques and shops, which display Western and Native American arts, crafts and fashion.
  • Airport - There is a small airport in Sedona where Scenic Airlines, provides flights to and from Phoenix and the Grand Canyon.



Events Calendar
January: Red Rock Fantasy of Lights at Los Abrigados Resort
February: Sedona's International Film Festival
March: St. Patrick's Day Parade
April: A Taste of Taos
May: Pow Wow & Native American Arts Celebration
May: Hopi Show, art, crafts, food and dancers
May: Western Americana Festival, arts, crafts, car & static air show
June: Annual Sedona-Verde Valley Astronomy Festival
July: 4th of July Fireworks
September: Gathering of Indian Nations Festival
September: Annual Jazz on the Rocks
October: Sculpture Walk
October: Sedona Arts Festival
November: Red Rock Fantasy of Lights at Los Abrigados Resort
December: Red Rock Fantasy of Lights at Tlaquepaque

Accommodations

Sedona Lodging Hotels/motels

There are resorts, hotels and motels in Sedona with something for every taste and price range. For more information and a complete list. Click Here. (Hotel Rates, availability, customer reviews and reservation online)

Camping

  • There are 6 campgrounds in Oak Creek Canyon
    • 173 sites total on a first come first serve basis
    • No electrical hookups or shower facilities
    • Contact Sedona Ranger Station 928-282-4119 for more information or the Sedona Chamber of Commerce
  • Arizona State Parks: 602-542-4174
  • Arizona National Forests: 800-280-CAMP

More on Sedona

Sedona's Red Rocks, Rugs & Riches The Technicolor Landscape Of Sedona

Resources & Nearby Attractions

Resources


Cities & Towns

Parks & Monuments

Wilderness & Recreation Areas

  • Beaver Creek State Recreation Area: 20 miles south.
  • Coconino National Forest: Adjoins Sedona.
  • Prescott National Forest: Adjoins Sedona.
  • Sycamore Canyon Wilderness

Historic & Points of Interest

  • The Arboretum at Flagstaff: (Flagstaff)
  • Oak Creek Canyon: North of Sedona via SR 89A.
  • Chapel of the Holy Cross: 3 miles south of the "Y" (intersection of Hwy. 179 & 89A).
  • Red Rock Crossing/Crescent Moon Ranch: W. Hwy. 89A to Upper Red Rock Loop Road.
  • Jerome State Historic Park (Jerome)

Share this page on Facebook:


DesertUSA Newsletter -- We send articles on hiking, camping and places to explore, as well as animals, wildflower reports, plant information and much more. Sign up below or read more about the DesertUSA newsletter here. (It's Free.)


The Desert Environment
The North American Deserts
Desert Geological Terms

SEARCH THIS SITE









 



The Saguaro Video
The Saguaro often begins life in the shelter of a "nurse" tree or shrub which can provide a shaded, moister habitat for the germination of life. The Saguaro grows very slowly -- perhaps an inch a year -- but to a great height, 15 to 50 feet.

The Desert Food ChainDesert Food Chain Video
A food chain constitutes a complex network of organisms, from plants to animals, through which energy, derived from the sun, flows in the form of organic matter and dissipates in the form of waste heat.

Prickly pear cactus Video
Prickly pear cactus are found in all of the deserts of the American Southwest. Most prickly pears have large spines on their stems and vary in height from less than a foot to 6 or 7 feet.




Hot temperatures in the desertAre you interested in the temperatures in the desert?

Click here to see current desert temperatures!

DesertUSA is a comprehensive resource about the North American deserts and Southwest destinations. Learn about desert biomes while you discover how desert plants and animals learn to adapt to the harsh desert environment. Find travel information about national parks, state parks, BLM land, and Southwest cities and towns located in or near the desert regions of the United States. Access maps and information about the Sonoran Desert, Mojave Desert, Great Basin Desert, and Chihuahuan Desert.



 
   
 
   
Copyright © 1996-2014 DesertUSA.com and Digital West Media, Inc.