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Southwest Adventure, Living & Travel


Grants, New Mexico

Native American pueblos

 

Grants, located in northwest New Mexico, is the gateway to a number of national parks, monuments and Native American pueblos, including Chaco Canyon, El Malpais, El Morro, Acoma-Sky City and Laguna. It is 70 miles west of Albuquerque and 80 miles east of the New Mexico/Arizona border via Interstate 40. The region encompasses lakes, mesas, spectacular lava flows, Indian ruins and majestic mountains like 11,301-foot Mount Taylor.

Population / Elevation

  • 8,900 people / 6,460 feet above sea level

Weather / Climate

The Four Corners area is renowned for its year-round pleasant climate, but with an elevation of over a mile, Grants has a year-round cool climate. Average low temperatures in winter and summer are 18° and 52° F. respectively, while average highs are 47° and 87° F. Average rainfall is 10.5 inches; Winters are usually chilly with an average snowfall of 12.8 inches.

 Grants, New Mexico - Monthly Climate Normals
   Year  Jan  Feb  Mar  Apr  May  Jun  Jul  Aug  Sep  Oct  Nov  Dec
 High °F

67.0

45.3

50.7

57.5

66.9

75.6

85.8

87.6

84.5

79.2

68.8

55.7

46.6
 Low °F

32.8

14.0

18.5

23.7

29.9

38.5

47.1

54.9

52.9

44.5

32.5

22.1

14.5
 Avg °F

49.9

29.7

34.6

40.6

48.4

57.1

66.5

71.3

68.7

61.9

50.7

38.9

30.6
 Rain

10.57

0.51

0.44

0.53

0.45

0.58

0.58

1.73

2.07

1.35

1.10

0.57

0.66


Click for Grants, New Mexico Forecast


History

The 3 Grant brothers -- Angus, Lewis and John -- were contracted to build the railroad through this region of New Mexico. As they established base camps during their work westward, the first in this region became known as Grant's Camp, then Grant's Station and eventually simply Grants. The town grew as a farming community until 1950 when a Navajo rancher discovered uranium on Haystack Mountain, 10 miles west of town. U.S.Atomic Energy Commission contracts immediately created a mining boom in Grants for what turned out to be one of the largest uranium reserves in the world. This prosperity lasted until 1983, when a recession forced the closure of Grant's uranium mines and mills.

Although Grants was founded in the late 1870s, people had been making this region their home since the 12th century, when the Anasazi established an advanced civilization in Chaco Canyon to the north. With more than 5,000 inhabitants, Chaco included 40 underground ceremonial kivas and communal living quarters with more than 600 rooms. The Anasazi suddenly disappeared, but anthropologists trace the roots of today's Native American Pueblo Indians living throughout western New Mexico to these ancient people.

Today, Grants is a growing tourist destination favored for its fishing and boating at Bluewater and Ramah lakes, its championship golf, its proximity to Anasazi ruins and its outdoor recreation in national monuments and forests.


Things To Do

Events Calendar

  • February: Mt. Taylor Winter Quadrathlon - New Mexico's premier multi-sport winter event. The 4-event race -- biking, running, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing -- starts in Grant at an elevation of 6,500 feet, climbs to the 11,301-foot summit of Mt. Taylor, then returns to the Start/Finish line, a total of 44 miles.
  • May: La Fiesta De Colores - Celebrates western New Mexico's Spanish heritage.
  • July: Wild West Days - Independence Day weekend Fireworks Extravaganza.
  • September: Bi-County Fair
  • October: Fall Chili Fiesta

Native Americans

Western New Mexico has a history rich with Native American culture. Throughout the year, arts and crafts festivals offer authentic Indian pottery, rugs and jewelry from various pueblos, including nearby Acoma and Laguna pueblos. Prehistoric sites also abound in the region, including nearby "Inscription Rock" at El Morro National Monument and Chaco Culture National Historic Park.

Outdoor Recreation

  • Water Sports / Fishing at Bluewater and Ramah lakes
  • Mountain Bike Trails in Cibola National Forest
  • Hiking & Climbing Trails in Cibola National Forest and El Malpais National Monument.


Hotel/Motels

There are hotels and motels in Grants, New Mexico with something for every taste and price range. For more information and a complete list. Click Here. (Rates, availability and reservations online)

Camping & RV Parks

There are 5 campgrounds in the nearby Cibola National Forest. For more information contact:

Mt. Taylor Ranger District
1800 Lobo Canyon Road
Grants, New Mexico USA 87010
Phone: 505-287-8833

There are 4 Camping/RV parks in the Grants area. For a complete list contact:

Grants/Cibola County Chamber of Commerce
100 Iron Avenue; P.O. Box 297
Grants, New Mexico, 87020
Phone: 505-287-48902; 800-748-2142.

Resources & Nearby Attractions

Resources


Cities & Towns

Parks & Monuments

Recreation & Wilderness Areas

  • Cibola National Forest: 10 miles east and west.

  • Ice Caves and Bandera Crater: 30 miles south in El Malpais NM.

  • Mt. Taylor: 22 miles north.

  • Laguna Wildlife Conservation Office

Historic & Points of Interest

  • New Mexico Museum of Mining: (Grants)

  • Laguna Pueblo: 42 miles east.

  • Acoma Pueblo-Sky City: 39 miles southeast.

  • Acoma Indian Reservation: 10 miles east.

  • Navajo Indian Reservation: 38 miles west.

  • Zuni Indian Reservation: 58 miles west.

-- Bob Katz


 


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