Emil and Julia Thomas Bakery

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Ozarker
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Re: Emil and Julia Thomas Bakery

Post by Ozarker » Mon Sep 30, 2013 11:03 am

Hello StevenTrost:

Nobody called Sims Ely a liar. It was clearly posted above that Sims Ely made an honest mistake.

Later authors capitalized on that honest mistake by inventing some "history" that never happened. Using the Sanborn Fire Insurance maps, they saw that there was a small room at the rear of that store and they decided to place Jacob Waltz in it to die. They created an elaborate sequence of events that allowed Dick Holmes and Gideon Roberts to enter that part of the store from the adjoining alleyway on the night of Waltz's death. Little did they know that Sims Ely had made an honest mistake, which turned out to be only one of the fatal flaws in their newly invented history. Yes, Julia Thomas had a confectionery store on Washington Street between Center and Montezuma (First Street) as is clearly shown in the 1892 City Directory. But it was on the north side of Washingon in the Capitol Building, which had no adjoining alleyway on the side of the store, and no small room in the back for Waltz to die in. The entire tale of Waltz dying in Julia's store on the south side of Washington, and Holmes and Roberts entering that store from the alleyway in order to hear Waltz's deathbed confession, and Julia Thomas selling tickets to Waltz's deathbed, and Frank Alkire witnessing and documenting those events from his nearby grocery store (which didn't even exist at the time), all fell apart - partly, if not mainly, because Julia never leased that particular store on the south side of Washington Street.

Regarding the street address. In 1889, the store that Sims Ely mistakenly identified as Julia's (the east half of Lot 13 in Block 22) had a street address of 33 East Washington. Sometime between November 1890 and June 1893, the City of Phoenix instituted a change in street addresses all throughout town to make them more uniform and to eliminate some of the confusion in street addresses that had occurred as Phoenix had grown. That particular store (mistakenly identified by Ely) was assigned a new street address of 23 East Washington Street. The 21 East Washington Street address that you cited above was actually assigned to the store occupied by McKelligon's Saloon - never to the store that was (honestly) mistaken by Sims Ely as being Julia's confectionery store.

You have cited an 1891 City Directory as proof that Julia was at the location mistakenly identified by Ely. Could you please provide a link to that document or post a scan of the particular page here? I am unaware of an 1891 directory and would like to see the specific citation you are referring to.

The 1892 Phoenix City Directory does exist however, and the main listing for Julia Thomas can be seen here:

http://distantcousin.com/Directories/AZ ... p?Page=107


She is also listed in the same directory, in the business section, under "Cigars and Tobacco":

http://distantcousin.com/Directories/AZ ... p?Page=166


And she is listed a third time, also in the business section, under "Fruit and Confectionery":

http://distantcousin.com/Directories/AZ ... p?Page=169



It is perhaps this third listing in the 1892 City Directory that may be the most useful. As everybody can see, there are four (4) Fruit and Confectionery type businesses listed as being on Washington Street, between Center and Montezuma. Those four stores were under the proprietorships of Charles Donofrio, Phillips and Leggat, GVH Shaver, and Mrs Julia Thomas.

The store mistakenly identified by Sims Ely (south side of Washington) was occupied by Phillips and Leggat when Jacob Waltz died. The store occupied by Julia Thomas was on the north side of Washington, in the Capitol Building (which was a commercial building that had nothing to do with City Hall or the state capitol or any other government-type function).

The Phillips and Leggat store (mistakenly identified by Ely as being Julia's) and Julia's actual store on the north side of Washington Street were almost directly across the street from each other. Seriously, I mean directly across the street from each other. That may be why Sims Ely made the honest mistake - it seems to me like that may be an easy mistake to make, although there may be some other valid reason. Who knows?

But the actual locations of both Julia's store, and the Phillips and Leggat store, are documented in the Maricopa County records through lease agreements attested to by sworn Notary Publics, and duly reviewed and filed by the elected County Recorder. In addition to these legal documents, several newspaper articles make it clear that both stores were in operation at the same time, and especially make it clear that the store on the south side of Washington was operated by Phillips and Leggat (not Julia Thomas).

So, we have a single erroneous passage mentioned in Ely's book versus legally binding documents on file with the Maricopa County Recorder which are backed up by newspaper accounts of the day. It's not much of a stretch to figure this out.

For me, it's not so much the point that Ely made an honest mistake. It's that somebody took that mistake (without realizing it was an error on Ely's part) and created an entire new "history" that never took place. When Ely's honest mistake was discovered, the entire falsified history created by others was exposed for what it was. The really sad part is that both Julia Thomas' and Frank Alkire's names were sullied in the process, something they certainly did not deserve.



Mrs O:

You picked a really tough question to lead off with!!

It'll take me a bit to gather my thoughts on the Capitol Building's history. It is a rather long history, involving its initial construction, then being burned to the ground, then being re-built, all before Julia moved her business to that location. But long story short, the building was a commercial building owned by Lofus Goodrich, and housed four stores (businesses) of which Julia's was one. It was not involved with any function of city or state government. I am not sure (or don't presently recall) if there was a reason the owners named it the Capitol Building, but I'll check it out and get back to you.

I'll also recap the various Sanborn Fire Insurance maps. There were four that I have access to (1889, 1890, 1893, and 1901). By chance, are you using one of the maps from Helen Corbin's book (pages 130 and 132)? If so, keep in mind those maps were annotated by the person who provided them to Helen and are in error. They were specifically annotated to perpetuate the false history described above.


Roy:

Good to hear from you, and thanks for the welcome!


Larry

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Re: Emil and Julia Thomas Bakery

Post by StevenTrost » Mon Sep 30, 2013 11:29 am

Ozarker

Thanks for your opinion. However it is an opinion and not shared by everyone. I think your taking this way out into left field. Ely printed what he thought was correct, nobody took it and ran with it, thats yopur opinion and once more not shared by everyone. To me it seems Ely was correct, you are referring to 1892 phoenix directory's JWalz died in 1891 so we are not even on the same page. Ely printed this and was very specific. You say he got it wrong. I don't think so. I think you are taking 1892 and trying to fit it to 1891. thats just my opinion. No need to get upset and start throwing around your fece_. I think Ely had it right or he wouldn't have been so exact. Thats just my opinion.

Steven

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Re: Emil and Julia Thomas Bakery

Post by Ozarker » Mon Sep 30, 2013 12:12 pm

Hello StevenTrost:

You are correct, I am referring to the 1892 Phoenix City Directory. That is because Julia moved her business in the middle of 1891 (just 5 months before Jacob Waltz died).

She would not have appeared at the new location (either at the erroneous south side or the correct north side of Washington Street) in any 1891 City Directory, even if such a directory existed, because the information for City Directories was collected at the end of the previous year and into the beginning of the issue year.

In other words, the information for any such 1891 City Directory would have been collected in late 1890 or very early 1891, which was before Julia made the move to her new location.

More specifically, Julia Thomas physically moved her business to the new location on 28 May 1891, four days before her new lease took effect (Phoenix Daily Herald, 28 May 1891, Page 3 Column 2) and (Arizona Daily Gazette, 29 May 1891, Page 4 Column 2). Her lease began exactly four days later (Maricopa County Records, Lease Book 2, Page 132).

The very first directory Julia could have possibly appeared in at her new location was the 1892 City Directory.

It's not that I'm trying to force fit anything.

It's just the way things worked out.

Larry

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Re: Emil and Julia Thomas Bakery

Post by Mrs.Oroblanco » Mon Sep 30, 2013 7:32 pm

Ozarker,


No- did not get the information out of Helen's book. Like I said - when we started, we went to a LOT of libraries, etc., so, we have a pretty good collection of stuff that was taken from microfilm, microfisch3, books, etc., and put into our own library. We have our own microfische and microfilm viewer.

Thanks,

Mrs.O

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Re: Emil and Julia Thomas Bakery

Post by oroblanco » Mon Sep 30, 2013 8:55 pm

Interesting stuff amigos!

I suspect that the wrong address (if wrong) came from Julia herself, not Ely, as Mitchell also stated the same description of her shop being across from the City Hall, and he got his info from the same source as Ely.

The capital building is quite another matter and very complicated! Here is an extract, mainly for our readers whom are not posting:
A “moving saga” of our Arizona Territorial Capital began soon after Governor Goodwin and his party’s January 1864 arrival near Del Rio Springs in Chino Valley where they set up a temporary camp. It was determined that the location was unsuitable as a capital site. Without delay, Governor Goodwin spent months touring the territory to find a suitable site for the capital and ultimately chose the area that would be named ‘Prescott’ among miners and gold strikes. In May, the Governor moved to the banks of Granite Creek in Prescott and here was built the log structure which was home to the first two territorial governors…now the Governor’s Mansion at Sharlot Hall Museum.

Tucson was rightfully miffed about Governor Goodwin’s selection of Prescott as they had the population, missions and productive mines. Because they sided with the Confederacy for military protection, they became “ineligible” as a capital of the new territory since the Civil War was still in progress.

A census, districts established and an election for 27 territorial legislators followed, with only six residing in the Prescott area. The first territorial legislature, called the Assembly, met in Prescott in a log cabin and it wasn’t long before there was talk of moving the capital south. The cold winter and difficulty in travel prompted the discussions. Thus began the annual contentious north-south problem that persisted until 1889.

Each year the Assembly voted where to meet the following year. A choice between Prescott and Tucson was often decided by the slimmest margin. They met in Prescott for the first three years (1864-1866), then, with the Civil War over, Tucson for the next ten years (1867-1876) and back to Prescott for the following twelve years 1877-1889).

Meanwhile, Phoenix was busily progressing from a tiny ramshackle farm community to a growing city with an active “booster” element. Brick buildings were rising instead of adobe. They emphasized that the central location would be more convenient for the legislators. Furthermore, they would provide a permanent capitol building. Newspapers wrote about freely offered “boodle sacks” (bribery money) and serious arm twisting continued.

As the capital moved north or south, the distant representatives groused about the cold or hot weather, crossing rivers without bridges, tedious stage rides, possible highwaymen, poor roads and frequent accidents. It was so bad, they claimed, that many would ride the Santa Fe Rail to Los Angeles then Southern Pacific to Tucson (or the reverse route) rather than chance the road trip to and from Prescott.

The night before opening the January 1889 Prescott legislative session, there was much “creative lobbying” by Phoenix advocates. Next morning, bleary eyed legislators considered House Bill 1, an Act to Remove the Capitol of the Territory to Phoenix. The Assembly held all the required readings, voting and passing it easily and within one hour of the Council (Senate) readings and voting affirmatively, Governor Meyer Zulick signed the Act into law. Rather than have the move apply to the next year, as was the custom, they merely recessed that January day in 1889 and moved to Phoenix.

Phoenix lavished legislators with an $1800 welcome banquet. Fortunately, a bill to cover $1800 “moving expense” died in committee when legislators were reminded that Phoenix “boosters” already volunteered to pay moving expenses and to loan them furnishings as well as the use of the two-year-old Phoenix City Hall until a permanent capitol building could be built. A second floor was quickly added with crews working day and night and the stone addition to city hall was completed in time for a February reconvening of the legislators.

Finally, the north versus south issue was resolved. The original, permanent capitol building construction began in 1898 and was in operation by 1901
<from http://www.sharlot.org/library-archives ... -25-years/

So City Hall was also the territorial capital, remember Arizona did not become a state until 1912.

Please do continue, and Mr Roberts, the assay report being referred to was posted by a person going as "Wasp" and no one assigned it to you, it was one of the many smoke screens and disinformation that has been throwin into circulation around the LDM legend. This discussion took place on the LDM forums, and I believe it is still there if you are curious.

Good luck and good hunting amigos, I hope you find the treasures that you seek.
Oroblanco

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Re: Emil and Julia Thomas Bakery

Post by Ozarker » Mon Sep 30, 2013 9:01 pm

Mrs O:

For lack of a common frame of reference, I'll simply refer to the maps in Helen Corbin's book (The Bible) Pages 130 and 132. I don't know how familiar you are with the layout of the Original Phoenix Townsite (Hancock Survey), so I may be including detail here that is too grade-school, but please don't take offense if that's the case - I mean no disrespect.

The map on Page 130 of Helen's book is of Block 20, as well as the unnumbered city block lying immediately to the south and known as The Plaza. As shown on the map, Block 20 was on the north side of Washington Street, while The Plaza was on the south side of Washington. Both Block 20 and The Plaza lay between Montezuma (First Street) and Maricopa (Second Street). The Plaza is where City Hall was constructed in 1888.

The map on Page 132 of Helen's book is of Block 21 and Block 22. Block 21 is exactly one block west from Block 20 (discussed above) meaning it is also on the north side of Washington Street, while Block 22 is on the south side of Washington (and lies directly west of The Plaza). Both Block 21 and 22 lie between Center and Montezuma (First Street).

Referring back on Page 130 (showing Block 20) the store marked as "Julia's First Bakery" was the location of Steinegger's store, where the Thomases and Alex Steinegger were in business together (known as the Vienna Bakery). However, it was not Julia's first bakery in Phoenix per se. Remember, she started her own stand-alone business when she and Emil first arrived in Phoenix. So in actuality, the Steinegger store was where she was involved with her second business (albeit with her husband and Steinegger as partners).

Returning again to Page 132, the business shown in Block 21 (north side of Washington) labeled as the "George Roberts Saloon" was actually the Capitol Saloon (run by Pierce "Ben" Butler) and it was located in what was known as the Capitol Building. The store immediately adjoining the Capitol Saloon on the west (labeled "Restaurant") was the store in the Capitol Building that Julia Thomas leased in June 1891, just five months before Waltz died.

Also on Page 132, in Block 22 (south side of Washington) you'll see a store labeled "Julia Thomas Bakery". That particular store is the one mistakenly identified by Sims Ely as Julia's store. At the time of Waltz's death, it was being operated as a confectionery by Phillips and Leggat.

And before we leave the map on Page 132, note the store labeled "Alkire Grocery" (shown on the north side of Washington in Block 21). This was apparently in support of the false history that was being circulated (from his grocery store window, Alkire was supposed to have witnessed the spectacle of Julia selling tickets to Waltz's deathbed, among other things).

The thing is, the Alkires never owned a grocery store in Phoenix. They eventually started a successful dry goods business in January 1893 (Maricopa County Recorder, Articles of Incorporation Book 1 Page 634) and they leased space for that new store the very same month, when they bought out the lease of Dillon and Keneally Dry Goods (Maricopa County Recorder, Lease book 2 Page 230). But this store was located on the south side of Washington, and it wasn't started until 15 months after Jacob Waltz had died.

(At the time of Waltz's death, the store labeled as the Alkire Grocery was actually the grocery store of E. O. Gant - see the details in Lease Book 2 Page 139)

(BTW, I'm not sure why the Capitol Saloon was mislabeled as the "George Roberts Saloon", although I am fairly certain that, like the Alkire Grocery, it had to do with the false history being circulated)

Finally, regarding your question about the naming of the Capitol Building where Julia relocated her business. The following passage is from Farish's History of Arizona, Volume 6 Chapter IX, Page 197-198 (Thomas Farish, 1918):

"In June, 1872, Johnny George and Jack Walters completed a new adobe building, fronting 66 feet on Washington Street, between First Street and Central Avenue and separated into two compartments by a covered alley, one of which was used for a restaurant, running back sixty feet, and the other for a saloon, running back forty feet. A second story of frame served as the hotel part of this establishment, the second to maintain accommodations for travellers arriving in Phoenix. This was also the first two-story building to be erected in the town. The saloon was opened for business on Sunday, June 9th, 1872, the proprietors serving liquors and dinner free to all. The restaurant was opened to the public soon after, in connection with which they conducted the hotel. Their place of business was known as the Capitol House, and was a very popular retreat, George having charge of the hotel and restaurant, and Walters of the saloon. This building was located on East Washington Street about where the Capitol poolroom is now located, and adjoining on the west the little adobe store of Morgan and Dietrich. The main portion of this old building was destroyed in the great fire of 1886, which swept away nearly the whole of the north side of Washington Street between First and Center Streets."

The original of the above passage can be found at this link:

http://southwest.library.arizona.edu/ha ... div.9.html

After the building was rebuilt by Lofus Goodrich following the 1886 fire, its name was formally changed to the Capitol Building, although many old-timers continued to frequently refer to it by the old name, Capitol House, or simply The Capitol.

An excruciatingly detailed chronology of the building's deeds and leases can be found on the Feldman forum here, in my post title "Capitol Building History":

http://www.thelostdutchmangoldmine.com/ ... 8&start=15


I think that's all I'll tackle for now. I hope it cleared up some of your questions!

Larry

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Re: Emil and Julia Thomas Bakery

Post by Ozarker » Mon Sep 30, 2013 9:23 pm

Hello All:

Just a short note for clarification.

Whenever you see a reference to Julia's business as being either "across from the Plaza" or "across from the City Hall" (they mean pretty much the same thing, since the City Hall was built on The Plaza) it refers to one of the following two periods:

August 1885 to February 1887 (when Julia and Emil were in partnership with Alex Steinegger in Block 20)

or

April 1887 to May 1891 (after Emil and Julia left the Steinegger partnership, but before Julia moved to the Capitol Building)


Larry

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Re: Transcript of Julia Thomas Lease (Capitol Building)

Post by Ozarker » Mon Sep 30, 2013 9:31 pm

For ease of reference, here is a transcript of the lease executed by Pierce "Ben" Butler for Julia's store in the Capitol Building. The original can be viewed at the following link:

http://recorder.maricopa.gov/recdocdata/


Maricopa County Records
Lease Book 2 Page 132


This indenture made this 1st day of June A. D. 1891 [.....] between Pierce W Butler of Phoenix in the County of Arizona, Territory of Arizona, party of the first part, and Mrs Julia Thomas of the same County and Territory aforesaid, the party of the second part, Witnesseth:

That the said party of the first part has letten and by these presents does lease, demise and let unto the party of the second part the room formerly occupied as a saloon by James Coleman the same being situated in what is known as the Capitol Building in the City of Phoenix, with the use of the grounds in the rear of the same to the Alley, for the term of two (2) years and seven (7) months from the first day of June 1891, at the monthly rental of seventy-five dollars ($75) per month to be paid as follows: Seventy-five dollars upon the execution and delivery of this lease which shall be held by the party of the first part as security for the fulfillment of the covenant herein contained by the said party of the second part and thereafter one month’s rent in advance on the first day of each and every month of said term, commencing with the month of June 1891, except the last month of said term which shall be paid in advance as provided.

All of said rent shall be paid to Pierce W Butler at the Capitol Saloon unless otherwise directed by the party of the first part, and it is agreed that if any rents shall remain due and unpaid for the period of five days after it shall become due, or if default be made in any of the covenants herein contained then the seventy-five dollars advanced as security by the said party of the second part shall be forfeited to the said party of the first part, and the said party of the first part may reenter said premises and remove all persons therefrom, and in consideration of the said covenants the said part of the second part agrees to pay the said party of the first part the monthly rental as above provided, and if she fails to pay said monthly rental within five days from the day on which the same shall become due for any one month, then he will forfeit to the said party of the first part the seventy-five dollars so paid in advance as above provided, and at the expiration of said term she will quit and deliver said premises in as good condition as she received the same, reasonable use and wear thereof and damage by the elements excepted; and the said party of the second part agrees not to use said premises for any business classified by Insurance Companies as hazardous or extra hazardous, and she will not use or sub-let said premises for a saloon, barber shop or a cigar store, and the said party of the second part paying said rent and performing said covenants shall and may peaceably and quietly hold and enjoy said premises aforesaid.

In witness whereof the said parties have hereunto set their hands and seals this day and year first above written.


[Signature of] Pierce W Butler <plus Notary Seal>
[Signature of] Mrs E W Thomas <plus Notary Seal>


The Territory of Arizona
County of Maricopa

Before me Neri Osborn, County Recorder in and for Maricopa County, Arizona, on this day personally appeared PW Butler and Mrs EW Thomas wife of EW Thomas both personally known to me to be the persons whose names are subscribed to the foregoing instrument and acknowledged to me that they executed the same for the purposes and consideration therein aforesaid. And the said Mrs EW Thomas wife of the said EW Thomas having been examined by me privately and apart from her husband and having the same fully explained to her, she, the said Mrs EW Thomas acknowledged such instrument to be her act and deed and she declared that she had willingly signed the same for the purposes and considerations therein specified and that she did not wish to retract it.

Given under my hand and seal of office this 8th day of Sept. A. D. 1891

[Signature of] Neri Osborn
County Recorder

<County Recorder Seal>

By Eugene Graham
Deputy Recorder


Filed and recorded at the request of PW Butler Sep. 8, 1891 at 9:30 o’clock a.m.

[Signature of] Neri Osborn
County Recorder

<County Recorder Seal>

By Eugene Graham
Deputy Recorder

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Re: Emil and Julia Thomas Bakery

Post by somehiker » Tue Oct 01, 2013 12:25 am

Roy:

"The capital building is quite another matter and very complicated! Here is an extract, mainly for our readers whom are not posting:"

I have moved this discussion thread over to the LDM forum, where it may find a greater audience.

Regards:SH.

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Re: Emil and Julia Thomas Bakery

Post by TradClimber » Tue Oct 01, 2013 7:41 am

Hi SH,
Couldn't find the extract.
Lost in cyberspace?
Thanks,
TradClimber

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