The Peralta-Fish Map

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Choto
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Re: The Peralta-Fish Map

Post by Choto » Wed Feb 01, 2017 11:23 am

Not convinced?

Take a look at this fault line overlay in GoogleEarth. The Slide... the SALT RIVER site seems to be geologically unique.

Lots of coincidences starting to emerge.
ZlanapahFault.jpg
TectonicMap.jpg
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Re: The Peralta-Fish Map

Post by Joe Ribaudo » Wed Feb 01, 2017 12:47 pm

Choto,

I don't remember if Chuck had an opinion on the suicide, but I'm sure he did.

Here are a few pictures:

Image

Image

Image Chuck and I on my first trip into the range at 13.

Chuck at his claim on Black Top:

Image

Good luck,

Joe Ribaudo

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Re: The Peralta-Fish Map

Post by Choto » Thu Feb 02, 2017 2:32 pm

Thank you Joe.
Incredible to see those photographs.

Chuck and the others must have believed in the Peralta story. What about you? With the genealogy that we now have, with Clay's story, Cristobal's connection to Gabriel and Frank's map, are you convinced?

Anyway, the site on Canyon Lake, if it exists, looks to be well outside the wilderness area.
CanyonLake.jpg
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Re: The Peralta-Fish Map

Post by Choto » Fri Feb 03, 2017 5:21 am

I want to share another connection, the Gonzales Map tracing attributed to Charles M. Clark. This map includes the word "Battleground" at our "site on the Salt River", which was initially know as Zlanapah. Attached to this map is the story of the Gonzales massacre.

Here we have Jose Manuel Gonzales and his family as members of the Anza Expedition of 1775-6. Gabriel Peralta and his family would known the Gonzales family.

"1. José Manuel Gonzales, with his wife, María Micaela Bojorques, and children: Juan José, Ramon, Francisco, and María Gregoria. José Manuel was made a poblador of San José Guadalupe."

5. Corporal Gabriel Peralta was born at the presidio of Terrenate, in Sonora, in 1731; died in Santa Clara, California, October 22, 1807. His wife, Francisca Javier Valenzuela, and four children: Juan José, age eighteen; Luis María, age seventeen; Pedro Regalado, age eleven; and María Gertrudis, age nine, accompanied the expedition. Luis María enlisted in the Monterey company December 2, 1781, and served in the ranks for forty-five years. He was eight years a private, twelve years a corporal, and twenty-five years a sergeant. He was a soldier, engaged in many expeditions against the Indians, and was several times recommended for promotion to the commission grade of alférez, but never received it. He was retired invalido in 1826, and died in San José in 1851, aged ninety-three.

So, the families knew each other.

This is the same Manuel Gonzales who rode to California with Gabriel Peralta.
Apparently an Apache.

El derrotero de los minas oro apache

"The adobe was built in 1797 by Manuel Gonzelez, an Apache Indian — also the first resident, and second mayor, of San Jose. The second occupant was Luís María Peralta, who held the highest office in the community as commissioner. Both were part of the Juan Bautista de Anza expedition. The adobe is the last remaining structure from El Pueblo de San José de Guadalupe. See the Adobe’s horno, an outside working oven, or venture inside the home and see two rooms furnished as they might have been when they were occupied by the Gonzalez and Peralta families."

http://historysanjose.org/wp/plan-your- ... oric-site/

It seems that the Peralta and Gonzales families worked mines in the Superstitions. The Gonzalez expedition, working the mines at Tortilla Flat were nearly massacred with one or two escaping. The Peralta family, perhaps working further south on Black Top Mesa escaped ahead of any attack. After looking at the genealogy, I can confirm that there are no missing Peraltas or a common date of death. Meaning, no Peralta massacre.

The Gonzales genealogy might support the idea of a massacre. Something to keep in mind if you go poking around the site on Canyon Lake.

Manuel Gonzales had a son named Ramon. It was a Ramon Gonzalez on his "bedraggled" horse that allowed Clark to trace his map. This might be Ramon's son Ramon or, a Grandson.
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Re: The Peralta-Fish Map

Post by Choto » Fri Feb 03, 2017 7:00 am

From TREASURE TALES OF THE SUPERSTITIONS p.313/14/15 "Gonzales Map".

Follow the instructions found on the Gonzales map and you should reach this canyon. Note the 200 foot arrow that has been scratched into to soil. Others have written about this arrow which may be pointing to seven mines or "to placer field where nuggets are big as quail eggs".
Gonzales.jpg
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Re: The Peralta-Fish Map

Post by Choto » Fri Feb 03, 2017 8:02 am

I want to include a note about the Apache and Spanish/Mexican access to the Superstitions. From 1790 until 1831, well into the Mexican period, the Apache were essentially subdued. This was the Golden Age of Sonora, when the Gonzales and Peralta families safely could have and I think did enter the range.

Gonzales, was an Apache.
These were "Apache" mines.
It was an Apache massacre.

The massacre date?
1831, + or - ten years.

Again, if it happened, the Gonzales genealogy will confirm it.

Manuel Gonzalez
"Apache Indian Manuel Gonzalez built what is now referred to as the ‘Peralta Adobe’ in 1797, after arriving with the Juan Bautista de Anza expedition. One of the original settlers of San José, Gonzalez was appointed magistrate or alcalde of El Pueblo de San José de Guadalupe in 1785. Gonzalez chose the north-west corner of the new pueblo to build the Adobe for his family, where it remains to this day — a focal point of San Pedro Square Market in downtown San Jose. Gonzales was married first to Micaela, who died in 1780; he then married María Gertrudis Acebes in 1784. Gonzales’ five children were Ana María, Juan José, María Gregoria, Ramón Rosalino (Died aged 12), José Francisco Faustino, Romualdo and María Antonia. Gonzalez died in his Adobe in 1804".

3. Antonio Quiterio Aceves.
"Antonio Quiterio Aceves and his wife had one more child, Jose María in 1777 and in 1790 are living in San Jose as farmers with their sons Gregorio and José María. Cipriano enlisted into the San Francisco Company in 1785, and Pablo enlisted into the Monterey Company 1n 1789. In 1790 they are both still single and listed in San Francisco. Their daughter Petra married in 1778 Antonio Romero, a farm worker and they are living in San Jose with one son. Gertrudis married in 1784 the widower, Manuel Gonzáles, an Apache Indian and farm worker, and they also live in San Jose with two of Manuel’s children from his first marriage".

https://www.nps.gov/juba/learn/educatio ... 5years.pdf

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Re: The Peralta-Fish Map

Post by Choto » Sat Feb 11, 2017 12:59 am

ICM Document Solutions (http://www.icmdocs.com) shared how they achieved such amazing results with the Peralta-Fish Map.

“The map was scanned using various gray-scale and color settings. Color drop out technology was used to remove the red background from the image which allowed the darker ink of the text and drawing to become legible. Brightness and contract settings were also adjusted to provide the best quality image.”

Here is the color scan for comparison.

Image: SMHS
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Re: The Peralta-Fish Map

Post by Choto » Sat Feb 11, 2017 1:23 am

Gabriel Peralta

The suggested date of birth here is 1718 - compare to 1730.

"Along with Anza and Moraga on that colonizing expedition - the final effort in spain's northerly growth - were Gabriel Peralta; his wife, Francisca Valenzuela; three sons and a daughter. Gabriel Peralta was born in 1718 in Cordoba, Spain, the old Moorish capital (until 1078); according to a distant relative, interviewed by a reporter around the turn of the twentieth century, the Peraltas were "descended from the union of a chivalrous Spanish knight and a beautiful daughter of the Moors, who were wedded despite the fierce war of races."

One drop of Blood: The American Misadventure of Race
p.404

Gabriel Antonio Peralta
Patriarch of the family. Born circa 1730, native of Real de San Juan de Sonora, México, and came to California as a cabo (corporal) in the Anza party, 1775-1776. He was accompanied by his wife and four children. In 1777, he served at the San Francisco Presidio, was corporal of the guard at the founding of Santa Clara, and in 1790 he is listed as an invalido (retired soldier) at San José. He was one of the founding members of the pueblo of San José in 1777. He died October 22, 1807, and was buried at Mission Santa Clara. Gabriel married María Francisca Javiera Valenzuela on January 1, 1756, at Santa María Suamca Mission, Sonora, México. She died March 4, 1811, at Mission Santa Clara.


http://www.peraltahacienda.org/pages/ma ... io_Peralta


Corporal Gabriel Peralta was born at the presidio of Terrenate, in Sonora, in 1731; died in Santa Clara, California, October 22, 1807. His wife, Francisca Javier Valenzuela, and four children: Juan José, age eighteen; Luis María, age seventeen; Pedro Regalado, age eleven; and María Gertrudis, age nine, accompanied the expedition. Luis María enlisted in the Monterey company December 2, 1781, and served in the ranks for forty-five years. He was eight years a private, twelve years a corporal, and twenty-five years a sergeant. He was a soldier, engaged in many expeditions against the Indians, and was several times recommended for promotion to the commission grade of alférez, but never received it. He was retired invalido in 1826, and died in San José in 1851, aged ninety-three.

http://www.sfgenealogy.com/spanish/anzaexp.htm

The Peraltas were part of the de Anza expedition sent by Spain to colonize Alta California, which covers present-day California and expands several states to the east. The family, which included Gabriel Peralta, his wife and four children, arrived in the area in 1776. In 1820, the last Spanish governor, Don Pablo Vicente de Solá, awarded Luis Maria Peralta, the son of Gabriel Peralta, a piece of land called Rancho San Antonio as a reward for 40 years of service to the Spanish crown as a military sergeant.

https://oaklandnorth.net/2015/10/14/per ... t-stories/

Peralta Avenue -Gabriel Peralta, Owner of Large East Bay Ranch
A corporal in Anza’s company arriving at San Francisco with his four sons in 1776. He was the founder of the Peralta family in California. When the United States took over California in 1846 the Peraltas were the owners of most of what is now Oakland, Alameda and Berkeley. Their ranch contained about 49,000 acres and was called San Antonio. Just as Sutter lost his “empire” in Sacramento Valley during the gold rush, the Peraltas also lost, or sold for small sums, their huge holdings in the East Bay.


http://www.sfmuseum.net/street/stnames5.html

Luís Peralta was 17 years old when he came to California with his family. His parents, who were from Sonora, Mexico, were among the settlers led by Juan Bautista de Anza to the San Francisco Bay area in 1776. This group had made an overland trip of many months from Mexico to California. Luís' father, Gabriel, was a soldier, and the family lived in a log house that he built on the San Francisco peninsula.

http://factcards.califa.org/ran/sanantonio.html

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Re: The Peralta-Fish Map

Post by Choto » Mon Feb 13, 2017 9:51 am

Frank Fish's description of the Peralta Treasure Trove.

" The so-called Lost Dutchman is only one of a group of nine mines that were originally discovered by the Spanish miners, the Peraltas... When news of the purchase of Arizona by the United States reached the Peraltas, they prepared one last cleanup.... The Spaniards who had buried fifty mule loads of gold ore in a cave nearby..."

Buried Treasure and Lost Mines
p.63

50 mule loads x 150-300 pounds* = 7500/15000 pounds of gold ore.

Hidden "nearby" in a cave.
But "nearby" means nine mines in several possible locations including Black Top Mesa, Weaver's Needle and the Tortilla Flat/Salt River area.

I would also suggest Bluff Springs Mountain based on the following from Dead Men Do Tell Tales - Stories from the Diary of Frank L. Fish, page 60.

"BLUFF SPRINGS MOUNTAIN In the Superstition Mountains of Arizona. Located northeast of Weaver's Needle. Here, the Peralta family kept their pack animals on top of this flat topped mountain, as protection from the Indians. At the base of the mountain is a spring they used for water. Mexican sandals have been found here. Also found, are the places where ore was ground and where they slept.

and...

"George returned to the area to explore further. Working his way down from where he had found the remains of the old shovel and pick, he observed a small cave or opening near an outcropping of quartz and rhyolite."

Cave of the Bronze Cross
TREASURE TALES OF THE SUPERSTITIONS
P.177

*"U.S. Army specifications for pack mules state that 'American mules can carry up to 20 percent of their body weight (150 to 300 pounds) for 15 to 20 miles per day in mountains,'"

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Re: The Peralta-Fish Map

Post by Choto » Wed Feb 15, 2017 5:55 am

I have removed the Peralta genealogy post and apologize for any confusion. Based on new information, I must write that Christobal's connection to Gabriel is not as direct as I had believed. The idea is generally correct, however the Peralta genealogy is far more complicated than I had initially believed. Like "tangled wisteria branches" we are warned.

Recently, one of Christobal's relatives shared the corrected family genealogy and the story of an Apache attack on the Peralta family ranch which, was not in the Superstitions.

I had already spent some time looking at this branch of the family and am excited to write that my source's genealogy and story are verifiable.

My next post will include the corrected family tree and excerpts from my conversation with Mr. P.
Perhaps an interview or two with members of the family.


Again, I apologize for any confusion.
Genealogical research can be maddening.

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