North of Hyder (Dateland)

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Desert Cruiser
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North of Hyder (Dateland)

Post by Desert Cruiser » Mon Jun 15, 2009 3:49 pm

A place we've been to many times in the past. There is so much diversity here. And a lot of old (Hohokam) Indian sites dating back at least 800 yrs. These places are just North of the Little town of Hyder (one little store now). Back in the 20's this was a busy area with mineral spring hot baths. They have all dried up now.

This area is also noted for the deer, bighorn sheep, and reptiles in the area.

Don...

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Re: North of Hyder (Dateland)

Post by Plays In The Dirt » Mon Jun 15, 2009 7:13 pm

Desert Cruiser wrote:A place we've been to many times in the past. There is so much diversity here. And a lot of old (Hohokam) Indian sites dating back at least 800 yrs. These places are just North of the Little town of Hyder (one little store now). Back in the 20's this was a busy area with mineral spring hot baths. They have all dried up now.

Don....
Wow Don, great Photos. Those pottery sherds remind me of a couple of trips to outside of Hurricane a few years ago, I'm sure you remember those trips. Too bad I'm so far away now, hope you and Linda can find the time to come-up and visit someday. I can show you a bunch of equally interesting Historical mines - cabins and such up there. And most of them are where very few venture, certainly not tourists.

Greg (PITD)

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Re: North of Hyder (Dateland)

Post by EZRider » Mon Jun 15, 2009 7:36 pm

Great photos, Don! Despite having lived in Tucson, I had never heard of Hyder (or Dateland). For others who are curious, it's between Yuma and Gila Bend:

Dateland Arizona
Established in the early 1920's, Dateland Arizona was originally a water stop along the railroad lines. Back then, the old steam engines had to stop every 5 to 6 miles for water.
Located just north of the Mexico border on Interstate 8 between Yuma Arizona and Phoenix in the Arizona desert, Dateland was a welcome site to travelers during the hot summer. The irrigation pond substituted as a swimming pool on a regular basis to travelers that would dive in clothes and all. Temperatures here in Dateland can reach upwards of 120 degrees for about 3 weeks every year. And it happens during monsoon season, the only time of the year that we have any humidity. Imagine traveling during this time with no air-conditioning.
During the 1940's, Dateland Arizona was the site for two of General Patton's desert training camps, Camp Horn and Camp Hyder. In addition, in 1942, three airstrips were built here in Dateland for training B25 Bombers. Unfortunately, the airfields were only utilized for about two months. The buildings that were built for the airstrips were later used as part of an Italian internment camp. Of course, all of the buildings are long gone, but the airstrips, and many of the original foundations are still in existence.
At one time, there was a hot springs located in Agua Caliente, just a few miles from Dateland. It was considered an exclusive resort, and was visited by many of the famous movie stars of that generation. But, eventually, the hot springs dried up due to the tremendous amount of agriculture in the valley.
When Interstate 8 was built to replace old Highway 80, Dateland moved about a block north of its original location. The old building stood for many years, until it was finally torn down in 1997. All of the original pieces of the business still exist, the cafe, the gift shop, the gas station, the RV Park, and the Date Grove. The local community has grown a bit on the north side of the interstate, and we now have a brand new elementary school that currently has an enrollment of around 200 students.
Because of the hot desert environment, the military still uses the Dateland area for periodic training. Many of the American troops that are in Iraq, or who have been to Iraq, have spent some time training here in Dateland.
Local farming includes dates, citrus, cotton, shrimp, a dairy and alfalfa. Along with the restaurant, the gas station, and the gift shop the local businesses consist of a grocery store, a post office, a tire shop, and a local pub.
For three generations now, people have been stopping in Dateland during their travels across southern Arizona.

http://www.dateland.com/AboutDateland.html

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Re: North of Hyder (Dateland)

Post by Desert Cruiser » Mon Jun 15, 2009 8:57 pm

Gregg: Of course I remember. We still have the photos and did have a great time up there. Well we can't live where we want to sometimes. Heck we move around so much -- could call a lot of places home. Glad you liked the photos.

EZ rider: Thanks for the information that was definitely helpful. We know, and now others do too about the hot springs at Agua Caliente. It has a very interesting history to say the least. We just met another person who lived near there and says when he was young his parents moved because of the large numbers of Mojave Rattlesnakes in the area around the old town (that doesn't exist anymore) We're going to look into that -- of course!

Now as for the location of Hyder and Montezuma's Head (Face Mountain) and the general area these photos were taken -- should have done this before --- here's a topo map of the area with towns - Gila Bend, Dateland, and Hyder on it. Thanks again EZ - by the way take a look at the Snakes & Animals forum if you haven't already?

Image

Don....

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Re: North of Hyder (Dateland)

Post by EZRider » Tue Jun 16, 2009 7:58 am

Thanks for the topo map, Don, it explains a lot. U.S. maps around 1900 reflect how the automobile has re-defined the population centers. At that time, there was little in the way of developed surface roads and most towns originated because of access to waterways and railroads.

Our vast network of roads and highways was built up in a relatively short time and formerly flourishing towns (like Hyder) literally disappeared overnight!

EZ

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Re: North of Hyder (Dateland)

Post by Desert Cruiser » Tue Jun 16, 2009 12:26 pm

Your right about that -- the railroad spur thru Hyder is hardly ever used anymore and now the main run follows Interstate 8. There are numerous towns; some of which are now almost impossible to find, along the old spur. One we want to find is Northeast of Hyder. This area up thru Hyder to Interstate 10 is main path for illegals to get to I-10 from Mexico. It is overrun by Border Patrol. The railroad was a big draw for people back then in the late 1800's.

Don....

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Re: North of Hyder (Dateland)

Post by EZRider » Tue Jun 16, 2009 12:36 pm

Sometimes you gotta look hard, Don. Despite the fact that they scored the first post office in the area I was raised, the SINGLE remnant of that town is a short segment of concrete sidewalk!

EZ

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Re: North of Hyder (Dateland)

Post by pho2gr4 » Thu Jan 07, 2010 3:42 pm

Hi everyone, just got done reading the posts here and thought I'd post a little info as well.
When you're out and about on the way to Hyder, please stop in Dos Palomas Bar, located near the old Horn Gin. It is just a beer and wine cooler bar (no hard liquor). My husband and I own the bar, and we can tell you some places for some good rockhounding. Quartz crystals, chalcedony, desert roses and more, as well as locations for newbies as to where the Oatman family graves are located, and other places. In the winter, we lead self-guided tours for free (you bring your own 4x4 vehicle or high ground clearance vehicle, plus your own lunches and beverages. Don't forget to bring your own rock buckets!! And we lead the way). During hunting season, if you draw your deer tags for this area, I can show you where the deer are, as well as where the dove and quail like to go.

I would like to complement the man who found the Indian Site near the Face Mountain. That's on my bucket list for places to go...
Trish

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