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Wupatki National Monument

Home to prehistoric Anasazi and Sinagua farmers

Overview | Climate/Map | Description | Things to Do | Where to Stay | Nearby


Wupatki National Monument

Situated in the rain shadow of Arizona's San Francisco Peaks, Wupatki National Monument was once home to prehistoric Anasazi and Sinagua farmers and traders -- the Hisatsinom, as their Hopi descendants call them. Today, this 54 square miles of the Monument preserves many free-standing masonry pueblos, field houses, rock art, pottery, baskets and tools -- extraordinary evidence of a varied and complex lifestyle. Altogether, more than 2,700 archeological sites have been cataloged at Wupatki National Monument.

General Information

Rates & Fees

Entrance Fee: $5.00 per person includes both Wupatki and Sunset Crater Volcano (age 15 and under free).America the Beautiful, Senior Pass and Access Passes are accepted.

Commercial Tour Feescapacity  1-6 people - $28; 
7-25 people - $40; 
26 or more - $100

Seasons / Hours

The park is open year round. The Visitor Center is open daily (except Christmas Day). The dwellings are open dawn-to-dusk.
Note: Arizona is on Mountain Standard Time year round.

Visitor Centers

Open 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

Facilities/Features

Stores/Museums
The Visitor Center has museum exhibits and educational materials for sale.

Programs & Events
SPRING –Crack-in- Rock Hikes

4 weekends in April.  Two day Ranger guided backpacking trips into an isolated area of Wupatki National Monument to Crack-in- Rock which is a 12th century ancestral Puebloan site located on a mesa top.  The hike includes visits to rock art sites.
This hike is strenuous – over challenging terrain.  There are no trails. Reservations required.
For details and to sign up, call 928-679-2365

SUMMER
Daily patio talks on the back patio at the Wupatki Visitor Center

FALL Crack-in- Rock Hikes
4 weekends in October.  Two day Ranger guided backpacking trips into an isolated area of Wupatki National Monument to Crack-in-Rock pueblo, a 12th century ancestral Puebloan site located on a mesa top.  The trip includes visits to rock art sites.
This hike is strenuous – the terrain challenging – there are no trails. Reservations required.
For details and to sign up, call 928-679-2365

WINTER
From November through March – Ranger guided “Discovery Hikes” take place on Saturdays.  These are 2-3 mile hikes over moderate terrain to backcountry pueblo sites in the Monument.
Hikes leave from the Wupatki visitor center at 12 noon.  Groups are limited to 10 people.  Reservations required. For further information and to sign up, call 928-679-2365

Food/Supplies
There are picnic areas, but no other services in the monument. Vending machines are located behind the Visitor Center. Overnight accommodations, food, supplies and gasoline are available in Flagstaff (33 miles/53 km). Flagstaff Visitor Center: 1-800-842-7293.

Accessibility
The Visitor Center and Wupatki Ruin Trail, to the overlook, are accessible. Accessible restrooms are at Lomaki, Doney Picnic Area, Wupatki and Wukoki

Camping & Lodging

There is no lodging, camping or overnight parking in the Monument. U.S. Forest Service and private campgrounds are located in and around Flagstaff. There are hotels and motels in Flagstaff with something for every taste and price range. For more information and a complete list. Click Here. (Rates, availability and reservations online)

Precautions, Rules, Regulations

It is the visitor's responsibility to know and obey park rules. Regulations are designed for visitors' protection and to protect natural resources.

  • All vehicles, including bicycles, must remain on designated roadways. Always use designated parking areas; never stop in the roadway.
  • Observe posted speed limits - park roads are not designed for speed. Enjoy the scenery safely. Slow down at dawn and dusk and watch for animals.
  • Buckle up. Seat belts are required by law.
  • Do not feed wildlife. Avoid contact with rodents. The white-footed deer mouse is a carrier of hantavirus and prairie dogs can carry plague.
  • Poisonous snakes and insects are common but not aggressive. Keep a safe distance. This is their home and they are protected.
  • All natural resources, animals, plants, and rocks are protected. Look, but do not take.
  • Hunting is prohibited in the monument. Federal law prohibits firearms inside federal facilities and on certain trails in this park; those places are marked with signs at all public entrances.
  • Pets are not allowed in buildings, on trails, or tied to fixed objects. They may be exercised in parking areas on a leash. Summer temperatures may be fatal to pets in closed vehicles.


    Park Address
    Flagstaff Area National Monuments
    6400 N. Hwy 89
    Flagstaff, AZ 86004
    Phone (928) 679-2365 -- (928) 679-2349


    Overview | Climate/Map | Description | Things to Do | Where to Stay | Nearby

 


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