A ranger stands next to the thermometer at Furnace Creek Visitor Center. The Celsius reading should display 54 degrees. NPS

DEATH VALLEY, CA – Yesterday at 3:41 PM PDT (Sunday, August 16, 2020), a temperature of 130°F was recorded at Furnace Creek in Death Valley National Park. If verified, this will be the hottest temperature recorded on Earth in nearly a century.

On July 10th, 1913, the highest recorded temperature on earth was observed at Furnace Creek (formerly Greenland Ranch) at 134°F. On July 12th and 13th, 1913, other observations of 130°F and 131°F were recorded at Furnace Creek, respectively.

To verify this reading, the National Weather Service will test the sensor at Furnace Creek to verify that it is working correctly, and a climate extremes committee will be convened to verify the data.

Temperatures this week are forecast to continue a heat trend, with another 130°F temperature possible today (104°F for the low), and temperatures in the 120s for the rest of the week.

Over the past months and years, Death Valley National Park has set a number of daily and monthly heat records, and temperatures this week look to continue that trend.

“Working at a park that is the hottest place on Earth is really exciting,” said Park Superintendent Mike Reynolds. “We definitely come together as a community to celebrate these records and the uniqueness of living here but also quickly learn not to touch metal surfaces, like car doors, that have been out in the sun.”

When visiting Death Valley National Park during extreme heat conditions such as these, please plan ahead and take proper precautions to ensure a safe visit. It is not uncommon for vehicles to overheat in the summer here, so packing extra gallons of water, a shade tarp, salty snacks, and other survival gear are important. Minimize any time spent outdoors, and use long-sleeved, lightweight cotton clothing, sunscreen, and sun hats to keep the sun off from skin. More safety information can be found on our website at: https://www.nps.gov/deva/planyourvisit/safety.htm.

Source: NPS