THE LATIN HEART

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Jim Hatt

Re: THE LATIN HEART

Post by Jim Hatt » Mon Feb 22, 2010 8:19 pm

I think you are drifting a little too far "Outside the Box" there SH, but I will wait and see what you come up with, before I form any conclusions.

Jim

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Re: THE LATIN HEART

Post by RockyFrisco » Wed Feb 24, 2010 7:54 pm

The cartoon horse on the stone is really well done. It also doesn't look like an ancient drawing; almost like a modern cartoon. What a mystery.

Jim Hatt

Re: THE LATIN HEART

Post by Jim Hatt » Wed Feb 24, 2010 9:04 pm

Well... The Priest on the opposite side of the Horse Stone is also a little cartoonish too, if you look at it that way Rocky. But, The message is in what they represent, not in the drawings themselves. That is wherein the real Mystery lies.

Jim

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Re: THE LATIN HEART

Post by RockyFrisco » Thu Feb 25, 2010 12:46 pm

Getler and Brewer's take on it was really interesting. Maybe a little bit of a stretch, but who can say. I suppose it's possible some of Bob's insights might be valid even if the KGC wasn't involved. He seems to have a real knack for this kind of puzzle. I've been having great fun comparing their book and Corbin's with some navigation in Google Earth. I like to go to Weaver's Needle and get right at the top and view in a circle from that viewpoint to see where it would be visible from. Has anybody climbed Weaver's Needle and Miner's Needle? Looks like it might be fun in the winter months. Is there any consensus about the "face" across from the mine?

It would sure be nice if some of us could post Lat & Long figures for some of the locations, like where the trees were cut and where Jacob's cabin was. Google Earth also has a great feature where you can make a line between objects and it calculates the exact distance. Then, since it's not only the desert, but also the Superstitions, you can triple that, or more. :)

Wonder if there's any connectivity in the area, like satellite internet. Would be fun to use Geolocation along with Google Earth there.

-Rock

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Re: THE LATIN HEART

Post by cubfan64 » Thu Feb 25, 2010 1:18 pm

RockyFrisco wrote:Getler and Brewer's take on it was really interesting. Maybe a little bit of a stretch, but who can say. I suppose it's possible some of Bob's insights might be valid even if the KGC wasn't involved. He seems to have a real knack for this kind of puzzle. I've been having great fun comparing their book and Corbin's with some navigation in Google Earth. I like to go to Weaver's Needle and get right at the top and view in a circle from that viewpoint to see where it would be visible from. Has anybody climbed Weaver's Needle and Miner's Needle? Looks like it might be fun in the winter months. Is there any consensus about the "face" across from the mine?

It would sure be nice if some of us could post Lat & Long figures for some of the locations, like where the trees were cut and where Jacob's cabin was. Google Earth also has a great feature where you can make a line between objects and it calculates the exact distance. Then, since it's not only the desert, but also the Superstitions, you can triple that, or more. :)

Wonder if there's any connectivity in the area, like satellite internet. Would be fun to use Geolocation along with Google Earth there.

-Rock
Hi Rocky,

There was a woman by the name of Celeste Marie (Maria?) Jones who was searching for a Jesuit treasure in the Superstitions. I don't have my references in front of me at the moment, but I believe it was sometime between the mid 50's through the mid 60's.

She was quite a character (Corbin's book may contain information about her) as she had visions and financed a crew to work around Weaver's Needle looking for the treasure. I know she had one or more of her men climb Weaver's Needle during her time there and I know Helen Corbin's wife Bob climbed it at least once. There was a story I read about someone finding an alabaster cross on top of the Needle and I believe at one point she was convinced the treasure was hidden somewhere inside the Needle. My guess is she would have ended up blowing the whole thing up if she could have.

Helen Corbin's book has a number of inaccuracies and questionable information from what I've been told, but it's still a very good read. I'd definitely recommend you pick up Thomas Glover's book "A Golden Dream" if you can find it used somewhere at a reasonable price. There is a great deal more information in it.

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Re: THE LATIN HEART

Post by RockyFrisco » Thu Feb 25, 2010 2:39 pm

I will look for Glover's book. Thanks!!

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Re: THE LATIN HEART

Post by RockyFrisco » Thu Feb 25, 2010 2:52 pm

Found it! Abebooks had copies and I used my coupon to save a little bit. Thanks!!

Jim Hatt

Re: THE LATIN HEART

Post by Jim Hatt » Thu Feb 25, 2010 2:56 pm

RockyFrisco wrote:
It would sure be nice if some of us could post Lat & Long figures for some of the locations, like where the trees were cut and where Jacob's cabin was.
-Rock
Rocky,

I have spent more than 20 years learning where many of the things talked about in the books are actually located. There were plenty of people around during that time who could have just told me, and saved me a lot of time searching. But... they wouldn't! The pleasure is in the search they say... :lol:

When someone invests the time necessary to locate these things, they are usually not willing to just tell someone else where they found them. It's not that they want money. It's more along the lines of... they don't want anyone else to know.

That's Treasure & Lost Mine Hunting! ;)

Jim

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Re: THE LATIN HEART

Post by cubfan64 » Thu Feb 25, 2010 4:30 pm

RockyFrisco wrote:Found it! Abebooks had copies and I used my coupon to save a little bit. Thanks!!
You're quite welcome Rocky - I hope it didn't cost you too much as I know they are getting more and more difficult to find. Dr. Glover had spoken a year or two ago about doing a reprint, but there is really only a fairly small community (at least in the book world) who read and collect those kinds of books, so last I heard he decided not to do it - it would have lost him money I believe.

You'll enjoy the book alot - I'm confident of it.

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Re: THE LATIN HEART

Post by RockyFrisco » Thu Feb 25, 2010 6:22 pm

I understand. I guess I'm just a different kind of old coot. :)

I'm in a number of Music Halls of Fame, but I do my best to show all of the secrets to the youngsters who are struggling to figure it all out. I can show them in 45 minutes pretty well everything I learned in months of Music Theory in College. I don't bother with musical history or the big words used to describe things; I just show them the Nashville Numbers and how to construct major and minor scales and let them run with it. Then, about the only thing you need to show them is the diminished and augmented chords, since they aren't that easy to figure out.

No doubt lost treasure is a horse of a different breed. :)

One of the ways I have found secrets in the McElmo area is to just sit and soak up an area's "spirit." I can also find out a lot from reading petroglyphs; if you know any "sign language," they are pretty clear. In most cases, if it says "Water over there," it's still there, hundreds of years later. It's good to pay attention to these, since sometimes it says, "Be careful; you might fall." I once spent a few hours telling Grandfather David my take on the world and human life. Then we sat for around an hour, silently drinking coffee, with him smoking hand-rolled cigarettes, then he grinned and said, "Well, that's pretty well the way it is; good for you."

I use that attitude when I search for things. If you're empty enough, the world will fill you up with the information you seek.

Can't thank you enough for this forum; I'm really enjoying it.

-Rock

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