Hiker's Hell

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silent hunter
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Re: Hiker's Hell

Post by silent hunter » Wed Jun 16, 2010 5:36 am

Mrs Oro I changed my wording in the response where i said our boy's are in 130 heat, to include girls to. You are so rite about the topics you moderate. I am a bit belicose. Not my normal mood and ask for forgiveness. That is a beautiful girl in the photo. Amazing!!

Kurt P

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Re: Hiker's Hell

Post by TradClimber » Wed Jun 16, 2010 11:20 am

34 years ago I found Joe’s last will in a side pocket of his backpack.

“I Joe Cermack 11 E. James Way, Cary, Ill. had to leave this pack after being stranded in this canyon. I do not believe anyone will ever find this, but if anyone does, its yours to keep. for you would have had to struggle like I did to get it.”

Joe’s beliefs was wrong and his inexperience cost him his life. For me the terrain was not at all difficult. I could not imagine myself giving up and dying here. Being experienced can make all the difference between life and death.

See attached link for full story.
http://www.rmru.org/missions/1970s/1976-026.htm

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Re: Hiker's Hell

Post by LDMGOLD » Wed Jun 16, 2010 8:28 pm

TRAD:

This is really excellent information for people who do solo hikes without much experience. Solo hiking is a risky business no matter how careful you are or the information you leave behind in case you don't make it out.

Thanks for the great information and examples.

Tom K.

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Re: Hiker's Hell

Post by TradClimber » Fri Jun 18, 2010 12:32 pm

29 years ago my brother Dave and I found another inexperienced solo hiker that was lost in the desert. :)

See link below for full story.
http://www.rmru.org/missions/1980s/1981-042.htm

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Re: Hiker's Hell

Post by Mrs.Oroblanco » Sun Jul 18, 2010 12:23 pm

That was a made-for-television - movie.

2 young lost hikers found what was left of him - and it helped to save their lives (in the movie).

Beth

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Re: Hiker's Hell

Post by reptilist » Sun Jul 18, 2010 12:29 pm

Somebody needs to buy that Bernie fellow a beer!

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Re: Hiker's Hell

Post by Mrs.Oroblanco » Sun Jul 18, 2010 3:47 pm

It addition to what Tom K said about solo hikers, I would add to that, the "runners". Every year we have seen solo
runners in the Supes - I suspect most are fairly local people, but they do not always "prepare" for an accident or an
emergency situation.

If you are a runner, and you are running in the desert - any desert - bring, at least, a daypack with some emergency
provisions. A 10 ounce bottle of water is NOT enough.

Beth (Mrs.O)

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Re: Hiker's Hell

Post by Jim Hatt » Sun Jul 18, 2010 5:40 pm

You know Beth...

I hate to be blunt about it, but it is becoming more and more difficult, for me to ignore the complaints.

Some day you are going to have to get down to the brass tacks, of sharing some of your own desert adventures and experiences, instead of just sitting in judgment of everyone else's all the time.

This is becoming a problem that we really need to work on correcting.

I'm sure you and Roy have some wonderful experiences you could share, and they would be a lot more interesting to us, than your opinions about how everyone else should do things.

The best way for others to learn from your experiences, is for you to share them in text and photos, (Showing us how you do things) and that is far more enjoyable to read, than constant mini lectures.

Best,

Jim

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Re: Hiker's Hell

Post by Jim Hatt » Sun Jul 18, 2010 6:17 pm

reptilist wrote:Somebody needs to buy that Bernie fellow a beer!
Terry,
Let's buy him 3 and help him drink them! :lol:

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Re: Hiker's Hell

Post by LDMGOLD » Tue Jul 20, 2010 9:48 am

Folks:

I try to alway go into the mountains prepared. A good hat with a wide-brim, a bandana I keep moist around my neck, particularly the back of my neck, a minimum of two liters of water, and an emergency survival kit. My survival kit fits in a small metal bandaid can. There are many things you can carry in a survival kit. Everyone considers different things, but experience has taught me certain things are essential. They include the following, a very small compass, aluminum foil, couple of fish hooks, twenty feet of nylon line, a needle, water proof matches, a small lighter, a condom, ten feet of rabbit snare wire, single edge razor blade with tape on the sharp edge, four three inch nails, three brass fishing swivels, a one foot piece of baling wire, small pencil, paper, small bottle of iodine (very small), four feet of flexible 1/8 inch tube, a leather patch, and four very elastic pieces of rubber. Now, I don't want to write a book here, but each one of these items can be essential in survival. Again if you can't get them all into a metal band-aid can you will never carry them all the time. The challenge is to get as much of this stuff into a band-aid can you can carry in your pocket at all times when in the wilderness. I carried my in my chap pocket, not my saddle bags. My horse was known to dump me once in a while. The average person with common sense should be able figure out the value of each item I have listed. Building a survival kit was part of my college survival class years ago. In recent years I have found a Swiss survival knife is excellent to carry in place of a single blade Buck knife. Nothing replaces a good pair of boots that insulate you feet from the hot ground. White or light beige is the best color to wear. Cotton is better than synthetic material. I hope some of you enjoy the information. There are several other things you might add to a survival kit and I may have forgot a couple of things. lt has been more than twenty years ago I taught this class. I am not encouraging anyone to go into the mountains during the hot weather. The use of this survival kit was part of my class content. Please excuse any errors.

Take care,

Tom K.

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