3 hikers from Utah now missing in the Superstitions

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Mrs.Oroblanco
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Re: 3 hikers from Utah now missing in the Superstitions

Post by Mrs.Oroblanco »

It is a sad thing - for Jesse, and anyone else that has a mishap in any area and their families and loved ones. I do have some unanswered questions - which will forever stay unanswered - but, at some point we will be hiking up there to put a memorial at the site. It was a long hard-fought event to bring Jesse back home - and all the folks involved in that - will forever have the respect and love from Jesse's family. (and I'm including everyone from all the Supes guys here, and everywhere, and Robert Cooper and his crew, and every single person who spent time either searching, or helping seachers with water, etc.) I wasn't 100% sure that bringing him home would ease his mother's suffering, but, it did. He's home, he had a lovely service and all is right again - and, (and this is not me, but Cynthia) - she told me she never realized just how many people there are in the world who would give their time and life for someone they never knew. I agree - treasure hunters, prospectors, and "nutcases", as some people refer to us - are a pretty darned good community. :P

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Re: 3 hikers from Utah now missing in the Superstitions

Post by Casca »

TY Ms Oro, that put it all into perspective, had the trail disappear on me a few times too. I don't have gps, or a map, I usually use the sun, and a few large peaks I can see for miles. I like the outdoors and would enjoy the Supers, but as you say, things get weird sometimes out in the wilderness. I don't like breaking brush, so could understand Jesse trying to get back to camp before nite, or a sudden weather change. I know one thing that has caused me to change direction real fast is Bee's. You don't get much of a warning till you too close. Maybe it was bee's?

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Re: 3 hikers from Utah now missing in the Superstitions

Post by somehiker »

No bees out in December.
But if he got caught in the rain, the rocks can get awful slick.
Especially if you're on a steep slope.

Regards:SH.

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Re: 3 hikers from Utah now missing in the Superstitions

Post by eunderhill »

It's been quite a while since I have been on here. My belated condolences to all of the families of these men.

As for Jesse Capen, it's remotely possible that he might have encountered bees in December. I had an encounter once near the mouth of Momument Canyon with a sentry bee in December of 2006. I was quite surprised by the encounter and made a hasty retreat. I certainly didn't expect to see any bees active at that time of the year. As for rain, I don't consider that to be a likely senario anymore. Based on information from the Jesse Capen thread and one news report, Jesse had left the AJ motel on December 4th with the intention of staying out in the wilderness for a few days. And then return to the motel, basically going back and forth between the wilderness and the motel multiple times. At least that was his general plan. Jesse was out there on the 4th as a note was found by some hikers on top of Tortilla Mountain that was signed by Jesse and dated December 4th. As for rain, the first rain fell seven days later on December 11th (I checked back in 2010 for the first rain info for December 2009). It was a pretty severe storm as I remember it. Since his cookware was never used and he never returned to the motel that would place the date of the accident on the 4th. So basically this is how I see it happening, Jesse had arrived at the site he set up his camp around mid to late afternoon and then climbed on top of Tortilla Mountain possibly to have a look around. He noticed it was starting to get dark and started to make his way down. He then was caught on the side of the mountain after the sun set which is what Matthew is suspecting. I could be wrong, but I don't recall any of the news stating a flashlight was found with Jesse's remains or in the pack that was with him. So I would say that he tried to get down in the dark and went over the ledge that he fell off of. I've always heard that it is highly recommended to stay put if in that type of a situation and make the best of it until sun rise. It is possible that he may have had an encounter with some bees but I'd say that it is very remote.

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Re: 3 hikers from Utah now missing in the Superstitions

Post by RBrown »

scorpionfan2012

Can you tell me where to find out about the cause of the death of the three Utah men? I read what Rick Gwynne told Tom Kollenborn about his discovery of two of them (and Tom printed in this in his Chronicles). Rick didn't say anything about finding any bullet holes in any of them.

Roger

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Re: 3 hikers from Utah now missing in the Superstitions

Post by Trailgypsy »

Might be able to get it from the County records. My understanding was there was nothing suspicious found on any of them. The family should be able to request a copy if no one else can.

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Re: 3 hikers from Utah now missing in the Superstitions

Post by eunderhill »

Without access to that information, I'd say that either heat exhaustion or heat stroke was the most likely the cause since they were out there in the middle of summer. They might not have been as used to the extreme heat us locals would be used to also was probably a factor.

I've been out there myself in the middle of the summer and I go no more than two hours walk from the trailhead, take advantage of any shade I find to rest in for about 5 minutes, wear a long sleeve linen shirt, wear a good hiking hat that protects the back of the neck, wear some welders gloves for sun and bush protection, wear sunglasses, and carry 6 liters of water in my Camelback. I find it helps to have a breeze blowing as it goes right through my linen shirt and hits the sweat to help keep me cool.

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