The Jesuits of the Southwest, first-person resources thread

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The Jesuits of the Southwest, first-person resources thread

Post by deducer » Wed Mar 19, 2014 8:24 am

My purpose in creating this thread is to create some sort of catalogue where all participants can list resources of first-person sources where the Jesuits of the Southwest are concerned. This means, books, letters, precepts, Relacions, that were written by Jesuits in the Southwest during the 17th-18th century. Please do not include books by secondary authors even if they deal directly with letters or precepts written by Jesuits, or history books about the Jesuits. Those are second-person sources.

For example, there is a new book out that contains translations of Fr. Segesser's letters to his family: "A Jesuit Missionary in Eighteenth-Century Sonora: The Family Correspondence of Philipp Segesser"
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Re: The Jesuits of the Southwest, first-person resources thread

Post by gollum » Thu Jan 19, 2017 4:37 pm

Okay,

Here are some staples that anybody researching Jesuits or Jesuit Treasure in the New World need to have:

1. "Rules and Precepts of the Jesuit Missions of Northwestern New Spain" by Father Charles Polzer SJ

2. "Missionary in Sonora; the travel reports of Joseph Och, S.J., 1755-1767" by Father Joseph Och SJ (original in German "Glaubenspredigers der S.J. in Neumexico. Nachrichten von seinem Reisen nach dem Spanischen Amerika, seinem dortigen Auftenthalte vom Jahr 1754 bis 1767, und Rückkehr nach Europa 1768. Aus dessen eigenhändigen Aufsätzen" The original journal was supposed to have been destroyed in an Allied Air Raid in 1944 or 1945. The current version was translated by Theodore Treutlein.

3. "Rudo Ensayo" by Father Juan (or Johann) Nentvig SJ

4. "Searching for Arizona's Buried Treasures: A Two Year Odyssey" by Ron Quinn. I include this book, because it was written by the man that found the 82 pounds of gold bars in the 1986 article in Treasure! Magazine. I promised not to publicly use his name, when he granted me permission to use his information (including a lot of pics he had never shared before). Here is the link to this story from my website:

http://1oro1.com/jesuits/rqfind.html

5. "Sonora A Description of the Provinces" by Father Ignaz Pfefferkorn SJ translated by Theodore Treutlein

While the next are not books, they have amazing collections of period documents:

1. DRSW: Arizona State's Desert Relations of the SouthWest. An online repository of documents. Many Jesuit letters, and they can even make you a copy of Father Eusebio Kino's Travel Journal in the original Spanish. Some interesting things there. For some, you may need to be able to translate Colonial Spanish/Jesuit Documents.

For anyone unfamiliar with Spanish Document Translation, I recommend going through a website called spanishpaleographytool.org It will the newbie through three of the most common Spanish Script Types in use during the 15th-18th Centuries. Although it is a great tool, it doesn't cover the most difficult to learn style, called "Chain Writing" or "Chain Script", in which there are no breaks between words. The reader has to understand. Its a bitch.

Another great tool that helped me at first, was a book printed by the University of Texas at Houston in 1951. It is a guide to assist in translating Colonial Spanish Documents.

2. My website's Reference Section. I have provided a crap-ton of historical books on mining, and everything associated, as well as a page of period maps:

http://1oro1.com/reference/referencebooks.html

http://1oro1.com/reference/historicalmaps.html


That will get anybody started, and give them enough to do for a year or two.

Best of Luck - Mike

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Re: The Jesuits of the Southwest, first-person resources thread

Post by deducer » Fri Jan 20, 2017 3:35 am

Hey Mike,

Good to see you posting again! I hope you'll resume posting more, esp. over at the other site.

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Re: The Jesuits of the Southwest, first-person resources thread

Post by Choto » Wed Apr 19, 2017 3:47 am

I want to add a letter written by Ronald E. Cash dated 1976. The problem is, I have never seen the letter but it is referenced in Tortilla Flat Arizona Then & Now.

Not sure if it qualifies as a first person resource or not.

Anyone know anything about Cash?

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Re: The Jesuits of the Southwest, first-person resources thread

Post by deducer » Wed Apr 19, 2017 12:52 pm

Choto wrote:I want to add a letter written by Ronald E. Cash dated 1976. The problem is, I have never seen the letter but it is referenced in Tortilla Flat Arizona Then & Now.

Not sure if it qualifies as a first person resource or not.

Anyone know anything about Cash?
Choto,

Does the letter have information about the Jesuits of the Southwest? If so, please feel free to post more about it.

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Re: The Jesuits of the Southwest, first-person resources thread

Post by Choto » Thu Apr 20, 2017 4:11 am

deducer wrote:
Choto wrote:I want to add a letter written by Ronald E. Cash dated 1976. The problem is, I have never seen the letter but it is referenced in Tortilla Flat Arizona Then & Now.

Not sure if it qualifies as a first person resource or not.

Anyone know anything about Cash?
Choto,

Does the letter have information about the Jesuits of the Southwest? If so, please feel free to post more about it.

"According to a 1976 letter from Ronald E. Cash Sr. and a map from June 1860 the following information was taken; Pinal is what the Jesuits called the mines, worked in what is now called Pinal County. There were eleven mines hidden from the Dons camp to Weaver's Needle and seven mines hidden from Weaver's Needle to First Water. The place was known as Geronimos Gold (worth 15 million to 7 billion) and is very dangerous."


Tortilla Flat Arizona Then And Now
L.L. Lombardi - Lois M. Potter-Sanders

As I wrote in my last post, I have not seen the letter.
But the number 18 sure is curious (11+7).

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