Rattlesnake ID

Goldseeker
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Re: Rattlesnake ID

Post by Goldseeker » Mon Aug 17, 2009 5:56 pm

I thought the green was the only one like that. Seems they are evolving with potency of the venom, if evolving is the correct word.

But these are AZ snakes, correct? Not Ca snakes, esp my area? BTW, I have not seen any rattlers here yet. 2 blocks away a friend found 2 in the backyard, a week apart. A db and a sidewinder. A month- 6 weeks ago.

And it seems like it will be an early fall. Thats IMO. So, maybe more movement then?

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reptilist
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Re: Rattlesnake ID

Post by reptilist » Mon Aug 17, 2009 6:30 pm

Seems they are evolving with potency of the venom
Not really, that's just another snake tall tale that has gotten too much press these last couple of years.

The Northern Pacific Rattlesnake...Guess where that lives?

Sycamore
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Re: Rattlesnake ID

Post by Sycamore » Mon Aug 17, 2009 7:58 pm

I'm not sure that the venom is changing, or just our ability to analyze it! :)

I believe the non-neurotoxic mojaves are in part of Arizona, and the others have the classic neuro toxic venom.

Sycamore

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Iggy
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Re: Rattlesnake ID

Post by Iggy » Mon Aug 17, 2009 8:18 pm

Here's a link on the range of the Northern Mohave Rattlesnake.
http://www.californiaherps.com/snakes/p ... latus.html

We have seen Mohave's here in SW. AZ.

Goldseeker
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Re: Rattlesnake ID

Post by Goldseeker » Mon Aug 17, 2009 10:01 pm

reptilist wrote:
Seems they are evolving with potency of the venom
Not really, that's just another snake tall tale that has gotten too much press these last couple of years.

The Northern Pacific Rattlesnake...Guess where that lives?



I have no idea. Why not just tell me? My whole thing isa to avoid getting bitten...

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Apache Devil
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Re: Rattlesnake ID

Post by Apache Devil » Tue Aug 18, 2009 11:05 am

North Pacifics are the only rattler in my neck of the woods in southern Oregon between the Coast and Cascade ranges. They are a fairly high-strung rattler that is usually around a foot and a half to two-feet long, but have the potential to get much larger. You do not want to mess with these temperamental guys if you do not know what you are doing. Like just about all rattlers, they will retreat if given a chance, but they do not take any crap if you mess with them, and their bite has killed people from time to time. I read that the majority of all those who have been bitten by the North Pacific were bitten while trying to kill the snake. These snakes with their pastel greenish earth tones and coon-striped rear ends are among the most beautiful of all the rattlers. They are often mistakenly called diamondbacks by locals.

Jerry Feldner
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Re: Rattlesnake ID and Old Wives' Tales

Post by Jerry Feldner » Thu Aug 20, 2009 7:59 pm

The Old Wives' Tale part is that venom potency is increasing. Dr. (MD) Sean Bush of Loma Linda Hospital is often quoted as saying that venom potency in the Southern Pacific Rattlesnake is increasing and changing to include neurotoxic characteristics. However, Dr. Bush denies that he ever said anything of the sort. If you want to learn about venoms you can Google Dr. Bush or Dr. William Hayes (PhD) of Loma Linda University and read what they have to say about venom potency of local (SoCal) rattlers.
Venom Potency is NOT increasing as the Old Wives' Tale insists.

Sycamore talks about "neurotoxic and non-neurotoxic" Mojave rattlers in AZ. We prefer to call these venom Mojavetoxin A (for the neurotoxic) and Mojavetoxin B (for the non-neurotoxic venom). Snakes with the "A" venom run in a range going across Arizona with snakes which have the "B" venom to the north and south of the neurotoxic snakes. If you want to learn more, check with the Poison Center in Tucson. They have a map showing the range of snakes with the two venom types.

Norm Johnson
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Re: Rattlesnake ID

Post by Norm Johnson » Fri Aug 21, 2009 2:31 pm

Jim_b wrote:I received this photo from Ron Mears, a DesertUSA reader. Looks like a Diamondback. It was taken in the Hueco Mountains, near El Paso, Texas. Camera is a Canon 5D

Jim

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That be a nice photo, Ron, of an unusual lookin' rattler!

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ElPaso2008
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Re: Rattlesnake ID

Post by ElPaso2008 » Fri Aug 21, 2009 2:42 pm

Norm Johnson wrote:
Jim_b wrote:I received this photo from Ron Mears, a DesertUSA reader. Looks like a Diamondback. It was taken in the Hueco Mountains, near El Paso, Texas. Camera is a Canon 5D

Jim

Image
That be a nice photo, Ron, of an unusual lookin' rattler!
Thanks, it's been a 2-3 times a day trip since I'm buying a canyon at the end of that trail, but he hasn't been sighted again.

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Apache Devil
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Re: Rattlesnake ID

Post by Apache Devil » Sat Aug 22, 2009 2:38 am

That is a blacktail. No offense, but it looks nothing like a diamondback.

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