Here you go Rep.

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reptilist
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Re: Here you go Rep.

Post by reptilist » Thu Apr 02, 2009 10:29 am

If you want to be safe from snakes, just pave it all in!

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Re: Here you go Rep.

Post by Desert Cruiser » Sat Apr 04, 2009 9:42 pm

Reptilist was just trying to explain the fallacy of just photos. It is extremely easy to fool a viewer is you know how to photograph an object to obtain that effect. It's been done with fishing photos for a long time and was also done with a photo of a wind scorpion that floated around the net for a long time and was supposedly photographed in Iraq. Here's an example of the same thing

Image Iggy caught this large mouth in the Colorado River and although is was a nice size bass this photo makes it look even bigger than the 4 lbs that it weighed. Notice her left arm is stretched out straight to put the fish closer to the camera?

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Re: Here you go Rep.

Post by John Hardison » Thu Apr 09, 2009 7:47 am

Allen wrote:
Dan wrote:A snake that size could ruin your whole day.

Big or small, IMO the only good Rattlesnake is a dead one.
I do rattlesnake relocations in Yavapai county (Prescott area) because of two reasons.
#1 To keep people and their pets from injury and expense of snakebit treatment
#2 to return the rattlesnake out of harms ways so they can do what they do best.. Control rodents. I have read that without the snakes rodents would be a worse problem, spreading illness and causing proptery damage.
In 2006 I won a community Hero award and $1000 which I donate the money to the AHA for public Education..
Back in my redneck days, if I saw a rattlesnake, it was a dead snake.. I made hatbands out of them and even deep fried them.. Not anymore

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John hardison

Post by reptilist » Thu Apr 09, 2009 8:56 am

Welcometo the forum John!

Like you, in my younger days I did the same thing to snakes that I found. Then, several years ago I developed some clarity and became able to identify my own motivations for that behavior. Essentially it was primal bloodlust, based in fear and justified as precaution.
Of course nowadays I also relocate snakes for my community and I find it to be much more satisfying than inflicting a cruel death.
Most of the community is prejudiced against snakes and will kill them right off. I don't put much effort into changing their minds because it's mostly a waste of time teaching new things to adults...They have to have their own awakening I guess~

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Re: Here you go Rep.

Post by Goldseeker » Thu Apr 09, 2009 11:00 am

You suprise me rep. You say you killed them until only several years ago. Somehow, I thought you were always fond of them. How long ago was it that you stopped killing them? If I see one way out in the desert and its not aggressive towards me or mine, it has no problems. But, sorry, around the house, they have to go. Just too dangerous, and how much does it cost now if you get bit? Its really a no-brainer.

On another note, on another thread on this forum, someone said the M Green may evolve into yet another sub-species, mixed with pacific rattler, producing even more deadly venom? Whats up with this?

The count is now 3 rattlers this spring that people I know have seen. Me zero. Me 1 shovel nosed snake, that is still around here somewhere, although it was moved to the vacant lot behind me. It was just to close to the sliding bedroom door for me. But, moved unhurt. If/when I see that red snake that lives in the firewood pile out back, I will try to get some pics. That one has been there a long time. All the dogs always go there and sniff around, always. Something's in there. Me, I take out firewood with a rake. Those 5 years in Amarillo, Texas instilled a lot of snake-caution in me! I hope!

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Re: Here you go Rep.

Post by reptilist » Thu Apr 09, 2009 11:26 am

The last rattlesnake I killed was probably 1998....There was no good reason for me doing it. I know that for lack of an alternative, in some circumstances, sometimes a snake must be humanely dispatched. But the problem with most folks is that their prejudices close their minds to any other option besides attacking it.

As for the snake article that butcher posted, I have been hoping Jerry Feldner would answer it. I will say that the supposed "cross breeding" comment is most probably hyperbole....Newspapers are famous for that. I don't believe cross breeding in nature is really all that common, much less become the norm.

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Re: Here you go Rep.

Post by Allen » Thu Apr 09, 2009 3:21 pm

reptilist wrote:The last rattlesnake I killed was probably 1998....There was no good reason for me doing it. I know that for lack of an alternative, in some circumstances, sometimes a snake must be humanely dispatched. But the problem with most folks is that their prejudices close their minds to any other option besides attacking it.

As for the snake article that butcher posted, I have been hoping Jerry Feldner would answer it. I will say that the supposed "cross breeding" comment is most probably hyperbole....Newspapers are famous for that. I don't believe cross breeding in nature is really all that common, much less become the norm.
I wouldn't call it prejudice in my case, just simple fear. :shock: :shock: As Goldseeker said, if it's not near my home, I just go around it and leave it alone. I just don't like the thought of one of my Grand kids or Dogs being bitten while out in the back of our lot. Mis-understanding, no doubt, but I just don't care for them anywhere near home.

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Re: Here you go Rep.

Post by reptilist » Thu Apr 09, 2009 5:33 pm

The snakes live around you whether you see them or not. Killing one of them does not change that fact. If you live on the frontier like I do, one might as well chase them away with a burst off the garden hose. For those who are somewhat self reliant and living among neighbors, I suggest buying snake tongs "for the ranch", and a five gallon bucket with a lid (aka 'gamma seal'). Then you can safely relocate them back to their nearby natural habitat, you neighbors will appreciate it too. (The risk of an angry rattlesnake escaping into your neighbor's property is much less using the right tools for the job, instead of hacking away at the hapless animals with with a shovel.)
But, like you, I would not allow a rattlesnake in the same yard as a kid or a pet either, it's just that I'm better prepared to handle it in a safe and humane manner so I do not have to kill it out of desperation.

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Re: Here you go Rep.

Post by Sandman » Sat Apr 11, 2009 8:04 pm

The ground squirrles around here are voracious and nothing gets em better than those big ol Pacific Diamondbacks. Snakes seem to avoid humans for the most part and tend to hang around places where there is food like woodpiles. I've read that their Pacific Diamondback venom is evolving and increasing in strength to counteract the resistance that is building in the ground squirrles. Interesting indeed. Has anyone else heard about this? I've encountered some of these guys that are 4-5 feet long with a long stack of rattles.

They also tend to hang around rock formations where the K rats build nests. Also of intrest is how the K Rats will stack cholla cactus thorns into the outer portion of their nests. I dont think a snake would be intimidated by stickers but i'm sure that a coyote wouldnt like one sticking into his nose. nature workd in mysterious ways sometimes.

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Re: Here you go Rep.

Post by Goldseeker » Sat Apr 11, 2009 9:25 pm

Sandman wrote:The ground squirrles around here are voracious and nothing gets em better than those big ol Pacific Diamondbacks. Snakes seem to avoid humans for the most part and tend to hang around places where there is food like woodpiles. I've read that their Pacific Diamondback venom is evolving and increasing in strength to counteract the resistance that is building in the ground squirrles. Interesting indeed. Has anyone else heard about this? I've encountered some of these guys that are 4-5 feet long with a long stack of rattles.

They also tend to hang around rock formations where the K rats build nests. Also of intrest is how the K Rats will stack cholla cactus thorns into the outer portion of their nests. I dont think a snake would be intimidated by stickers but i'm sure that a coyote wouldnt like one sticking into his nose. nature workd in mysterious ways sometimes.





GHHHreat! I've got a huge firewood plile out back. :cry:

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