OHV Use Education

MMM
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Re: OHV Use Education

Post by MMM »

Ok, even though I said I would not go through this mess, but here I go and will list the wilderness areas in the desert. First the list.

Mojave Desert Wilderness Areas
(also see: wilderness map)


55. Argus Range < North Mojave Desert

34. Bigelow Cholla Garden < East Mojave Desert

23. Bighorn Mountain < West Mojave Desert

39. Black Mountain < West Mojave Desert

44. Bright Star < West Mojave Desert

36. Bristol Mountains < East Mojave Desert

24. Cadiz Dunes < East Mojave Desert

28. Chemehuevi Mountains < East Mojave Desert

22. Cleghorn Lakes < East Mojave Desert

32. Clipper Mountain < East Mojave Desert

63. Coso Range < North Mojave Desert

65. Darwin Falls < North Mojave Desert

38. Dead Mountains < East Mojave Desert

43. El Paso Mountains < West Mojave Desert

64. Funeral Mountains < North Mojave Desert

41. Golden Valley < North Mojave Desert

40. Grass Valley < North Mojave Desert

42. Hollow Hills < East Mojave Desert

57. Ibex < East Mojave Desert

67. Inyo Mountains < North Mojave Desert

37. Kelso Dunes < East Mojave Desert

45. Kiavah < West Mojave Desert

46. Kingston Range < East Mojave Desert

66. Malpais Mesa < North Mojave Desert

56. Manly Peak < North Mojave Desert

47. Mesquite < East Mojave Desert

35. Newberry Mountains < West Mojave Desert

60. Nopah Range < North Mojave Desert

49. North Mesquite Mountains < North Mojave Desert

25. Old Woman Mountains < East Mojave Desert

51. Owens Peak < North Mojave Desert

59. Pahrump Valley < North Mojave Desert

68. Piper Mountain < North Mojave Desert

33. Piute Mountains < East Mojave Desert

61. Resting Springs Range < North Mojave Desert

31. Rodman Mountains < West Mojave Desert

54. Sacatar Trail < North Mojave Desert

50. Saddle Peak Hills < East Mojave Desert

20. San Gorgonio < South Mojave Desert

21. Sheephole Valley < South Mojave Desert

58. South Nopah Range < North Mojave Desert

48. Stateline < East Mojave Desert

29. Stepladder Mountains < East Mojave Desert

62. Surprise Canyon < North Mojave Desert

69. Sylvania Mountains < North Mojave Desert

30. Trilobite < East Mojave Desert

26. Turtle Mountains < East Mojave Desert

27. Whipple Mountains < East Mojave Desert

Now the facts about each.

Argus Range Wilderness

SIZE:74,890 acres
Bigelow Cholla Garden Wilderness

SIZE: 10,380 acres
Bighorn Mountain Wilderness

SIZE: 39,185 acres
Black Mountain Wilderness

SIZE: 13,940 acres
Bright Star Wilderness

SIZE: 9,520 acres
Bristol Mountains Wilderness

SIZE: 68,515 acres
Cadiz Dunes Wilderness

SIZE: 39,740 acres
Chemehuevi Mountains Wilderness

SIZE: 64,320 acres
Cleghorn Lakes Wilderness

SIZE: 33,980 acres
Clipper Mountain Wilderness

SIZE: 26,000 acres
Coso Range Wilderness

SIZE: 50,520 acres
Darwin Falls Wilderness
SIZE: 8,600 acres
Dead Mountains Wilderness

SIZE: 48,850 acres
El Paso Mountains Wilderness

SIZE: 23,780 acres
Funeral Mountains Wilderness

SIZE: 28,110 acres
Golden Valley Wilderness

SIZE: 37,700 acres
Grass Valley Wilderness

SIZE: 31,695 acres
Hollow Hills Wilderness

SIZE: 22,240 acres
Ibex Wilderness

SIZE: 26,460 acres
Inyo Mountains Wilderness

SIZE: 205,020 acres
Kelso Dunes Wilderness

SIZE: 129,580 acres
Kiavah Wilderness

SIZE: 88,290 acres
Kingston Range Wilderness

SIZE: 209,608 acres
Malpais Mesa Wilderness

SIZE: 32,360 acres
Manly Peak Wilderness

SIZE: 16,105 acres
Mesquite Wilderness

SIZE: 47,330 acres
Newberry Mountains Wilderness

SIZE: 2,900 acres
Nopah Range Wilderness

SIZE: 10,860 acres
North Mesquite Mountains Wilderness

SIZE: 25,540 acres
Old Woman Mountains Wilderness

SIZE: 146,020 acres
Owens Peak Wilderness

SIZE: 74,640 acres
Pahrump Valley Wilderness

SIZE: 74,800 acres
Piper Mountain Wilderness

SIZE: 72,575 acres
Piute Mountains Wilderness

SIZE: 36,840 acres
Resting Springs Range Wilderness

SIZE: 78,868 acres
Rodman Mountains Wilderness

SIZE: 27,690 acres
Sacatar Trail Wilderness

SIZE: 51,900 acres
Saddle Peak Hills Wilderness

SIZE: 1,440 acres
San Gorgonio Wilderness

SIZE: 37,980 acres
Sheephole Valley Wilderness

SIZE: 174,800 acres
South Nopah Range Wilderness

SIZE: 16,780 acres
Stateline Wilderness
SIZE: 7,050 acres
Stepladder Mountains Wilderness

SIZE: 81,600 acres
Surprise Canyon Wilderness

SIZE: 29,180 acres
Sylvania Mountains Wilderness

SIZE: 17,820 acres
Trilobite Wilderness
Size: 39,616 acres
Turtle Mountains Wilderness

SIZE: 144,500 acres
Whipple Mountains Wilderness

SIZE: 77,520 acres
A lot of wilderness.

Mike

Sal
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Re: OHV Use Education

Post by Sal »

These are motorcycles in a race. If they can safely display ID, why can't ALL OHVs be required to?

Image

Brew
Posts: 344
Joined: Sat Mar 28, 2009 10:43 am

Re: OHV Use Education

Post by Brew »

Sal wrote:These are motorcycles in a race. If they can safely display ID, why can't ALL OHVs be required to?
I agree that those are safe for the riders.
But, those bikes only have 3 characters for ID. Like you stated earlier, they would need 5 letters to cover the number of registered OHVs. Therefor, the letters would need to be smaller and would be much more difficult to display them around the head light. Plus, how many random letters can you read and remember on a vehicle that is in motion?

Brew

Sal
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Re: OHV Use Education

Post by Sal »

Anything's better than nothing Brew. It would be a start and bugs could be worked out. with 5 characters you could account for OHVs for many years to come.

Back to your earlier question about what's not to like about the DMV Indicia report.

Though they were specifically asked only to come up with ideas to ID vehicles, they had to add the following:


Identifying the owner of an OHV who breaks the law is important; however, without positive identification of the operator, prosecution will most likely be impossible given the attire normally used when riding an OHV (helmet, gloves, boots, protective gear, long pants, and long sleeves). Without positive identification of the operator, District Attorneys will not pursue prosecution, given that any number of individuals can operate a specific OHV.

If that was their feeling, why bother with the undertaking at all? If legislation was introduced today to make owners of OHVs responsible for all actions done on their vehicle, opponents could say "but there's no way to ID the vehicle so the law would be useless".

It has to start somewhere. DMV revealed their partisan attitude towards this project by the above statement and their final opinion which was--keep the status quo.

As long as riders are free to break the law with impunity, severe cases of wilderness and private property trespass will continue. All citizens concerned with the future of riding should support owner responsibility laws and visible ID.

Brew
Posts: 344
Joined: Sat Mar 28, 2009 10:43 am

Re: OHV Use Education

Post by Brew »

Sal wrote:
If legislation was introduced today to make owners of OHVs responsible for all actions done on their vehicle, opponents could say "but there's no way to ID the vehicle so the law would be useless".
They may have been applying the same law/logic that applies to street legal vehicles. Example: Law enforcement sees a speeding street legal vehicle and gets the license plate number but does not get a good look at the driver. By the time the law enforcement catches up to the vehicle, all occupants are outside of the vehicle. The law enforcement cannot identify who was driving and can't site anyone.
Sal wrote:It has to start somewhere. DMV revealed their partisan attitude towards this project by the above statement and their final opinion which was--keep the status quo.
This study was given to the DMV to do without influence from OHMVR Division to eliminate any indication of a partisan attitude. Just because their conclusions don't coincide with yours, it doesn't mean that they were partisan.

Brew

MMM
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Re: OHV Use Education

Post by MMM »

sal, long ago I and many people who ride OHVs were ok with the idea of having larger or full size plates. This is a subject that was addressed fully at that time. We asked also if we had big plates if anyone would also come forward to the idea of making non-street legal OHVs street legal. That way, to operate any OHV you would need to be at least 16 (that would make a lot of folk happy to keep young riders off adult sized machines) to be lincensed, have insurance, have proper helmets and so forth. That never happened. (partisanship at work?)

I notice that you fail to respond to wilderness areas in the state, after you posted this "MMM. if you're going to quote data, please link to your source. For example, where did you get the figures for the number of acres in the desert? What portion is public land and what part is private..etc." I posted the information and linked the site. I am concerned that when (and I fully believe this will happen) Johnson Valley is closed and converted into military use, where will people go to ride legaly? I see zero attempts to replace any open riding areas that are closed like this. I do see demands for ever more wilderness. When is the ballance?

Mike

JerryBee
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Re: OHV Use Education

Post by JerryBee »

OHV riders age 15 and under who wish to work an OHV on streets must be administered by an authorized grown-up, 18 or more established. The meaning of OHV education was explained to imply that if the administering grown-up is riding on another OHV, they should be sufficiently close to offer close help, help or bearing. On the off chance that the administering grown-up isn't riding another OHV, they should be inside 300 feet to offer close help, help or heading.

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