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Bryce Canyon National Park

Overview

Climate/Map | Description | What to See | Lodging/Camping | Nearby

Bryce Canyon is a small national park in southwestern Utah. Named after the Mormon Pioneer Ebenezer Bryce, it became a national park in 1928. Bryce Canyon National Park is a series of horseshoe-shaped amphitheaters carved from the eastern edge of the Paunsagunt Plateau in southern Utah. Erosion has shaped colorful Claron limestones, sandstones and mudstones into thousands of spires, fins, pinnacles and mazes. The park is characterized by an enormous array of oddly shaped "hoodoos," unique erosional formations whimsically arranged and tinted with a variety of subtle colors.

General Information

Rates & Fees

The entrance fee to Bryce Canyon National Park is $25 per private vehicle. The fee for an individual entering by foot, bicycle, motorcycle, or non-commercial group is $12.00 per person. Admission is for seven days and includes unlimited use of the Shuttle during it's operating season. No refunds are given due to inclement weather

Campsites: $15 per site per night. (Golden Age or Golden Access Passport holders receive a 50% discount.)

Backcountry Permits: $5 - 15 days per permit.

Where to stay Best Western Inn just outside the park. Click Here for more info

Seasons / Hours

The park is open 24 hours a day all year. There may be temporary road closures during and shortly after winter snow storms until plowing is completed and conditions are safe for visitor traffic. Road maintenance may require brief closures of individual areas at other times.

Visitor Center

The park visitor center is open year round except Thanksgiving Day, December 25, and New Years Day. The visitor center is open the following hours:

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Operating Hours
Summer 8am - 8pm (May - September)
Fall (October) 8:00 am - 6:00 pm
Winter (November - March) 8:00 am - 4:30 pm
Spring (April) 8:00 am - 6:00 pm
Phone 435/834-5322

Facilities/Features

Stores/Museums
General store at Sunrise Point which includes souvenirs and gift shop.

Programs & Events
A slide show, exhibits, rest rooms, information, publications sales, and back country permits are available at the visitor center. Check for a current schedule upon arrival. Also check with Garfield Travel Council for Utah Centennial events.

Ranger Nature Tours
Park rangers and volunteers conduct interpretive activities, including hikes, walks, geology talks and evening slide programs, throughout summer months. Star talks are conducted during the new moon and moonlight walks when the moon is full. Check at the park visitor center or Bryce Canyon Lodge for daily schedules.

Food/Supplies
General store at Sunrise Point. Groceries, souvenirs, camping supplies, quick meals, rest rooms, coin-operated shower and laundry facilities are available from April through October. Amfac Parks and Resorts, Inc. also operates a gift shop and dining room in the lodge and a snack bar at the General Store.

Private stores in the immediate area just 3 miles north of the Park Entrance are open year-round for food, supplies and other services.

Accessibility
Most park facilities were constructed between 1930 and 1960. Some have been upgraded for accessibility, while others could be used with assistance.

Because of the park's natural terrain, only a half-mile section of Rim Trail between Sunset and Sunrise Points is wheelchair accessible. The one-mile Bristlecone Loop trail at Rainbow Point has a hard surface and could be used with assistance, but several grades do not meet standards.

Parking is marked at all overlooks and public facilities. Accessible campsites are available in Sunset Campground.


Precautions, Rules, Regulations

It is the visitor's responsibility to know and obey park rules. Regulations are designed for visitors' protection and to protect natural resources.

General Regulations

Wildlife feeding, disturbing wildlife in any way, collecting of any historical or natural objects (including gathering dead wood or picking wildflowers) are prohibited.

Camp only in designated campgrounds; build fires only in grills, picnic only at designated picnic areas.

Firearms, hunting, trapping\and feeding wildlife are illegal.

Pets must be on a leash and physically restrained at all times. They are not allowed on trails or or unleashed.

Vehicles

Marked bus parking spaces are available at all sites where parking lots can accommodate buses. Bus engines should be turned off while parked. Motor homes and trailers are not permitted in spaces designated for buses.

Due to steep grades and limited parking, trailers are not allowed beyond Sunset Campground. Campers should leave trailers at their campsite. Day visitors should leave trailers at their overnight campground, at Ruby's Inn free shuttle parking area just outside the park, at the park visitor center or at the trailer turn-around south of Sunset Campground.

No vehicles over 25 feet in length are allowed at Paria View where the parking area is too small for large vehicles to turn around.

Unless otherwise posted, the Park speed limit is 35 mph on all roads.

Bryce Canyon Shuttle

The Shuttle for 2010 will begin May 7th and run through October 11th. The shuttle will operate from 8 a.m. until 8 p.m. each day. Route duration is about 50 minutes, not including stops at facilities and overlooks.

Superintendent,
Bryce Canyon National Park
P.O. Box 170001
Bryce Canyon, UT 84717-0001.
435-834-5322 (v) | 435-834-4102 (f)

Climate/Map | Description | What to See | Lodging/Camping | Nearby

 


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