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Imperial Sand Dunes

Mammoth Wash - Glamis/Gecko - Buttercup Valley

Recreation - Description - Star Wars Film Site - Plank Road - Where to Stay

Quick Overview

The Imperial Sand Dunes are the largest mass of sand dunes in California. This dune system extends for more than 40 miles along the eastern edge of the Imperial Valley agricultural region in a band averaging five miles in width. It is roughly bordered on the west by the Coachella Canal which delivers Colorado River water to the fertile agricultural valley to the north.

A major east-west route of the Union Pacific railroad skirts the eastern edge.The dune system is divided into 3 areas. The northern most area is known as Mammoth Wash. South of Mammoth Wash is the North Algodones Dunes Wilderness established by the 1994 California Desert Protection Act. This area is closed to motorized use and access is by hiking and horseback. The largest and most heavily used area begins at Highway 78 and continues south just past Interstate 8. The expansive dune formations offer picturesque scenery, opportunities for solitude, a chance to view rare plants and animals, and a playground for OHVs.

For more information click on the pictures below.

 

Recreation Area photo rider on dunes

RECREATION AREA

Star Wars film Site photo

"STAR WARS" FILM SITE

History of imperial sand dune photo

HistoryHISTORY

Old Plank Rd photo Imperial Sand Dunes

OLD PLANK ROAD

See a Photo Safari at the Sand Dunes.

Video available on this subject.Click here to see a movie about photography at the Sand Dunes.

Recreation - Description - Star Wars Film Site - Plank Road - Where to Stay


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