Desert Golf In The Summer
Tips on how to stay cool on the golf course.

golfer_sunThe Coachella Valley is a golfer’s paradise with more than 100 courses including private, semi-private and public courses.  In the summer, as temperatures rise to 110+ the rates to play golf drop.  Some clubs are offering rounds for as low as $10 per person with cart, others are in the $25 – $50 range.  Most of these courses charge fees of $75 to $150 or more during the winter season.

The summer savings are a great deal, but the weather can be a challenge.  Especially when the deals are for late morning and afternoon tee times.  Here are a few tips on how to take advantage of the summer golf rates and how to stay comfortable in the desert heat.

Tips on how to say cool
Always wear a hat with a brim.  Most players will wear a baseball cap, but in the summer consider wearing a hat that provides more shade on your face.  A lifeguard hat or Gilligan’s Island hat will cover your ears and more of your neck and face.  This makes a huge difference and helps your body stay cooler when you are in the sun.  Wear light-weight clothing that is light in color.  If you wear a dark blue shirt or other dark color your body will heat up much faster.  Wear white!  Wear sunscreen to keep your arms, legs and face from getting sunburned.  The sunburn will heat up your body and make you really uncomfortable.

Pack the cooler with ice and beverages
Most clubs provide coolers with ice on the club carts. The coolers are really too small to carry enough water, so you will either need to stop at the snack shop to buy more halfway through your round or take a cooler backpack or tote with you.  You can purchase water in the snack shop or pack your own depending on the clubs policies.  Buy a few sports drinks with electrolytes and enough water for the entire day of golf.

Drink water before you are thirsty.  Cold water really makes a difference. I often pack my own water from home as I drink a lot on hot days.   Ask on the phone when you make your tee time if their golf carts are equipped with coolers.

How much water will I need?
This past weekend I played 18 holes in 115F + weather.  I drank a total of 3 cans of Gatorade and at least 8 bottles of water during our round.  My golf partner felt a little weak and the Gatorade put the spring back in her step.  The sugar and electrolytes are important when you are doing a physical activity in the heat.  Your muscles need the fuel.  So take some snacks and a few sports drinks with you.  Take breaks in the shade when needed.  I would take at least 6 to 8 bottles of water and 2 to 3 sports drinks per person when it is 115F or hotter.  I drank about 6 bottles and 1 sports drink when it was 110 to 113F.  Everyone is different, but it is better to have too much vs. not enough.

What else can I do to stay cool on the course?
Pack a few hand towels that you can get wet in the ice water and put on your face or around your neck periodically.  Wear sunglasses and sunscreen.  Always park your cart in the shade if there is some available near the tee boxes, along the fairways and at the green.  The shade will cool you down and keep your cart cooler. Put a towel on the seat if you don’t have a lot of shade along the course you play. The vinyl seats heat up in the sun and can burn your legs.

If you follow these tips your day on the golf course will be much more pleasant.   Happy golfing!  Post some comments if you have other tips to share with readers.

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Lynn Bremner is the author of DesertRoadTrippin.com, a blog about desert road trips and tips. She started the blog after moving to Indio, CA where she now resides. Now a true desert dweller, Lynn has added in some of her own views on desert living. The heat does not keep her indoors in the summertime. She is out running, golfing or taking short day trips to some of the local points of interest. After years of traveling along the dusty, desert trails with her father, she has come to appreciate the beauty and solitude of the desert landscape. Her father’s passion for prospecting, desert lore and exploring the desert parks took their family to many interesting places, mostly in California, Nevada and Arizona. Lynn now writes about her desert road trips and intertwines a little bit of desert living into the mix.

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